Visa Slots Shrinking for Workers from India and China


     By The Shapiro Law Group

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Law Firm in Northbrook: The Shapiro Law Group
The number of green card of immigrant visas available for individual workers from India and China will shrink in months to come, according to pronouncements by Charles Oppenheim, the Chief of the Visa Control and Reporting Division at the Department of State.

The increase in demand for EB-2 visas (for workers with advanced degrees and exceptional abilities) involving foreign nationals from India and China has been large in recent years, and the annual supply of available visa numbers for natives of these countries is greatly less than the demand now.

In fact, the EB-2 visa process is so backlogged with applications for people from India and China that by May or June of this year, the cut-off dates on the Visa Bulletin (for priority of processing applications) will roll back to August 2007.

Furthermore, Mr. Oppenheim has stated that there will be no spill-over this year of unused EB-1 visas (for “priority workers” seeking permanent residency) into the EB-2 category as in past years.

As a result, it is quite likely that immigrant visas could become altogether unavailable for new, prospective EB-2 immigrants from India and China this year. However, an updated set of immigrant visa numbers will be published by October 1, 2012, when the new fiscal year begins for the Department of State and the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services.

If you are an employer or employer’s representative in need of foreign workers, do not hesitate to contact our offices for a consultation and/or feel free to check out our immigration law Website for further information.

AUTHOR: The Shapiro Law Group

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Disclaimer: While every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of this publication, it is not intended to provide legal advice as individual situations will differ and should be discussed with an expert and/or lawyer. For specific technical or legal advice on the information provided and related topics, please contact the author.



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