Colorado Bar Associations


Colorado Bar Associations - Statewide

  • Colorado Bar Association, Denver
    1900 Grant St, 9th Floor, Denver 80203, Phone: 303.860.1115

    CLE
  • Colorado Criminal Defense Bar (CCDB), Denver

    Criminal Defense Bar is dedicated to protecting the rights of the accused. The organization is unalterably opposed to the death penalty and committed to providing training and support to the criminal defense community.

    CLE
  • Colorado Gay Lesbian Bisexual Transgender Bar Association ("GLBT"), Denver

    The Colorado Gay Lesbian Bisexual Transgender ("GLBT") Bar Association is a voluntary professional association of gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender attorneys, judges, paralegals and law students and allies who provide a GLBT presence within Colorado's legal community.

  • Colorado Hispanic Bar Association (CHBA), Denver

    The CHBA's primary function is to serve the public interest by cultivating the science of jurisprudence, promoting reform in the law, facilitating the administration of justice, advancing the standing of its members in the legal profession and promoting the cooperation and development of Hispanic attorneys.

  • Colorado Indian Bar Association, Boulder

    The Colorado Indian Bar Association (CIBA) is a non-profit, 501(c)(3) professional organization of American Indian lawyers, practitioners of American Indian law, and Native American law students who reside in the State of Colorado. CIBA was founded in 1986 by a small group of lawyers who recognized the need for the interchange of ideas among those associated with Indian law. CIBA promotes the development of Indian Law for the maximum benefit of Indian people; strives toward justice and effective legal representation for all Indian people; provides a forum for Native Americans to become more involved in the local and national issues affecting Indian people; provides networking and support to encourage Native Americans to pursue careers in the law; and promotes the nomination of Native Americans for judicial appointments. CIBA regularly supports events that promote community awareness and education on Native American issues and/or American Indian law.

  • Colorado Women's Bar Association (CWBA), Denver

    The CWBA is instrumental in documenting the bias that still exists against women attorneys. Citing the CWBA's 1993 Economic Survey, the only survey of its kind in the nation, the January 8, 1996 New York Times stated: "Income comparison, notably a 1993 analysis in Colorado (by the CWBA and CBA), suggests that though male and female lawyers now start out with equal pay, an earnings gap opens in the first year of practice and widens rapidly." The CWBA is also dedicated to improving the status of minority women within the profession, encouraging their participationin CWBA activities and committees. The CWBA continues its work in this arena with the current "Gender Penalties Study."

  • Sam Cary Bar Association, Denver

    The Sam Cary Bar Association (SCBA) was formed in September of 1971, in order to create a self-help group to instill professionalism and serve as a vehicle for the exchange of ideas among African-American lawyers. The original members of SCBA were: Norman Early, Dan Muse, Honorable Raymond Jones, Gary Jackson, Phillip Jones, King Trimble, Billy Lewis, Honorable Alfred Harrell and Marilyn Cason. Probably the first controversial task undertaken by the new group was choosing "Sam Cary" as the name of the bar association. It was deemed by several African-American attorneys to be inappropriate to have a bar association named after an attorney disbarred from practice. However, an examination conducted by the organization into the life and law practice of Sam Cary (including an address to the organization by the Honorable O. Otto Moore, former Chief Justice of the Colorado Supreme Court), revealed that Sam Cary was indeed an appropriate person after whom to name the organization.

Colorado Bar Associations - Local

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