Catastrophic Injury Law




Catastrophic Injuries - Catastrophic injury means “consequences of an injury that permanently prevent an individual from performing any gainful work.” A catastrophic injury or illness usually occurs suddenly and without warning and can leave a person suffering from permanent disabilities for the rest of his/her life. Catastrophic injuries are any injuries that have serious, long-term effects on the victim. Catastrophic injuries can often put serious stress on the victim's family because they may need constant supervision or assistance for the rest of their lives, as well as a lifetime of rehabilitation and medical bills.

Catastrophic injuries can be caused by any number of different circumstances, and are considered catastrophic, due to the enormous impact they have on the lives of the individuals who experience them. A catastrophic injury or illness very often causes severe disruption to the central nervous system, such as spinal cord injuries or severe burn injuries, which in turn affects many other systems of the body. Some of the most common catastrophic injuries include: serious head trauma; accidental amputation; multiple bone fracture; eye injury; shoulder injury; foot injury; back injury; neck injury; brain injury; severe burns; organ damage; spinal cord and neurological disorders, which can result in paralysis; paraplegia; and quadriplegia. Catastrophic injury settlements seek to compensate victims for these lifelong disabilities.

What is Catastrophic Injury Law? If a catastrophic injury was caused by the negligent or intentional act of another, or by a dangerous or defective product, a personal injury claim by the victim will be an integral factor in determining his/her future quality of life, including the quality of the medical care and other support he/she will receive. Because of the huge financial implications a catastrophic injury has, one of the most important aspects of bringing a personal injury claim is the determination of the value of such a claim.

Legislatures throughout the country have imposed caps on "non-economic" damages, which can be quite low. A catastrophic injury lawyer can help recover compensation for the damages that the victim or his/her loved one has experienced, including: lost wages; loss of enjoyment of life; mental anguish; pain and suffering; lost future wages; permanent disability; and medical bills.

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Catastrophic Injury Law – US

  • Catastrophic Injury Litigation - Wikipedia

    Catastrophic injuries can be physically, emotionally and financially devastating. Victims and their families may be able to obtain compensation through a personal injury claim. This legal guide offers information on defining catastrophic injuries, types, causes, and how an attorney can help.

  • CDC - Injury, Violence and Safety

    Welcome to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. For over 60 years, CDC has been dedicated to protecting health and promoting quality of life through the prevention and control of disease, injury, and disability. We are committed to programs that reduce the health and economic consequences of the leading causes of death and disability, thereby ensuring a long, productive, healthy life for all people.

  • United States Department of Labor - State Occupational Injuries, Illnesses, and Fatalities

    State data presenting the number and frequency of work-related injuries, illnesses, and fatalities are available from two BLS programs: nonfatal cases of work-related injuries and illnesses that are recorded by employers under the Occupational safety and Health Administration's (OSHA's) recordkeeping guidelines are available for 46 States and Territories from the BLS Survey of Occupational Injuries and Illnesses (SOII); fatal cases of work-related injuries are available for all States, Territories, and New York City under a separate program, the BLS Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries (CFOI).

Organizations For Catastrophic Injury Law

Publications For Catastrophic Injury Law


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