Defamation Law - Guide to Libel and Slander Law




Defamation Law falls under Tort Law. It refers to false statements about a person, communicated as fact to one or more other persons by an individual or entity (such as a person, newspaper, magazine, or political organization), which causes damage and does harm to the target’s reputation and/or standing in the community. Defamation is addressed primarily by state legislation. However, Constitutional Law may also apply, as the right of freedom of speech also extends to certain defamation claims. Defamation is categorized as either Slander or Libel.

The general harm caused by defamation is identified as being ridiculed, shamed, hated, scorned, belittled or held in contempt by others, and lowers him/her in esteem of a reasonably prudent person, due to the communication of the false statement. This tort can result in a lawsuit for damages. Many states have statutes requiring that the allegedly damaged party must first demand a printed retraction of the defamatory statement, before they may proceed to court. If the plaintiff proceeds with a lawsuit without first seeking the retraction or if he/she receives a retraction but proceeds anyway, most states will limit the damages they may pursue to the actual or special damages they experienced, such as loss of employment or wages.

Malice – if intentional malice can be shown/proven, than the act usually qualifies as defamation for damage to one’s reputation. However, even without this, if it is obvious that the statement would do harm and that it is untrue, one can still pursue this tort if he/she can demonstrate actual/tangible harm, such as loss of business (called special damages).

Libel is defamatory statements and/or pictures published in print or writing; or broadcast in the media, such as over the radio, on TV or in film. The publication does not need to be made to more than one person to qualify as libel. However, it must be represented as a fact, not an opinion. If one libels the reputation of a deceased person, the target’s heirs may be able to bring an action for damages.

Oral defamatory statements are categorized as slander. Damages for slander are generally more difficult to identify and prove; although when malice is involved, it can be easier to accomplish. These statements must also be represented as fact, rather than just an opinion, to be considered slanderous. Slander of title refers to a remark regarding property ownership which maligns the owner and his/her ability to transfer the property, and results in a monetary loss.

Defamation Per Se refers to defamatory statements that are so vicious and the harm is so obvious, that malice is assumed, and proof of intent is not required for general damages (i.e. falsely accusing someone of committing a crime involving immorality; claiming someone has a repugnant, contagious disease; or statements claiming that the individual is unfit or unable to perform his employment duties.) Most states specifically recognize these categories of false statements as defamatory per se. Libel per se is also referred to as libel on its face, meaning it meets all the required elements without further proof. Defamation Per Quod is the opposite of per se, in that it is not obvious and extrinsic proof is required to demonstrate that the communication was damaging.

Exclusions/Exceptions/Defenses to defamation:

• “fair comment” - a statement of opinion which was arrived at based on accurate facts, which do not allege dishonorable motives by the person about whom the statements were made.

• Statements made about a public person (political candidates, governmental officeholder, movie star, author, celebrity, sports hero, etc.) are usually exempt, even if they are untrue and harmful. However, if they were made with malice – with hate, dislike, intent and/or desire to harm and with reckless disregard for the truth – the public person may have a cause of action. This was determined by the U.S. Supreme Court and has been re-interpreted various times.

• Minor errors in reporting, such as publishing a person’s age or title inaccurately or providing the wrong address.

• Governmental bodies due to the premise that a non-personal entity cannot have intent.

• Public records are exempt from claims of libel.

• Truth – the communication was true.

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Articles About Defamation Law

  • Expert Witnesses in Business Defamation Cases Explain Extent of Damages
    Defamation may not always be applied to business transactions, clients or customers, but even companies may be affected by false statements. When a single person is the victim of defamation, he or she may have his or her reputation negatively impacted. In some situations, this may lead to economic and financial difficulties.
  • Is There Such a Thing as a Federal Defamation Claim?
    Defamation cases are often either clearly obvious or difficult to determine. There are a number of elements that must be proven in court for a defamation case to be successful in the United States. Certain facts about the victim must have either been published or broadcast in some manner. This may also include false statements provided in the same way.
  • Unwanted Facebook Pictures: Has My Privacy Been Invaded?
    The digital world of the electronic age is rife with invasions of privacy, identity theft and various instances of crime. There are many situations where someone finds his or her picture online posted to Facebook.
  • When Can I Sue for Verbal Assault?
    There are instances that occur with frequency where someone is traumatized by the verbal actions of another. These could include name-calling, vicious rumors, descriptions of gruesome situations and many other similar issues.
  • When Electronic Snooping Is Illegal
    Electronic snooping has been determined to be a form of fraud through the use of computers by federal laws in certain instances. Felony charges may be issued to those that snoop in this manner, as information is stolen and terrorism may occur through cyber attacks and computer-related crime.
  • Cyber Bullying Laws
    Instances of cyber bullying have ranged from making fun of someone to pressuring someone to kill himself or herself. These crimes are often the foundation for self-harm and psychological damage that lasts for years. It is difficult to understand just how much damage is caused or impacts a person from these attacks.
  • Crime of Shoplifting
    Shoplifting occurs when someone goes into a store and takes something that does not belong to him or her. Many businesses have to carefully monitor shoplifting because it causes so much monetary loss to a business. This is why many people have had the experience of going in a store and being followed around because they are being suspected of shoplifting.
  • Hollywood Defamation Lawsuit Heats Up
    Defamation (untrue statements that damage a reputation) is becoming more widespread as a cause of litigation, as the internet makes it increasingly easy for these messages to spread. Many new lawsuits pertain to false reviews of, or malicious attacks on, businesses. Yet as one lawsuit between two Hollywood heavyweights reminds us, "old fashioned" defamation still occurs as well - and spreads just as easily.
  • Can I Sue a Company for Using My Image to Sell a Product?
    Many companies use photos of people when selling their brand or product. Often times, these photos are of models or professional actors. In some cases, businesses may use photos of private parties rather than expert models.
  • How to Calculate Damages in a Slander Case
    Slander occurs when a person makes an unprivileged false statement of fact that causes harm to that person or his or her reputation. Determining the amount of damages in a given slander case can help the plaintiff and lawyer determine the potential value of the case and if it is worth pursuing.
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Defamation Law - US

  • ABA - Media, Privacy, and Defamation Law Committee

    The Media, Privacy, and Defamation Law Committee concentrates on the law of and insurance coverage for media law issues, privacy law developments, and defamation law concerns. Our topics are wide-ranging within these spheres, including insurance coverage for controversial news reporting, invasion of publicity rights, unbiased press coverage, reducing liability exposure, freedom-of-information litigation, identity theft, maintaining a positive relationship with an insurance carrier, public access to court hearings, and a plethora of other subjects.

  • Citizen Media Law Project - Substantial Truth

    "Truth" is an absolute defense against defamation. See New York Times Co. v. Sullivan, 376 U.S. 254 (1964), and Time Inc. v. Hill, 385 U.S. 411 (1967). Consequently, a plaintiff has to provide convincing evidence of a defamatory statement's falsity in order to prove defamation.

  • Defamation Law - Positive Jurisprudence

    Over the past fifteen years, national and international courts have developed a body of case law that seeks to reduce defamation’s infringement on freedom of expression, a right guaranteed in treaties and constitutions around the world. Courts in democratic countries have played an especially significant role in reform because free speech is vital to their political system. The decisions exhibit noteworthy trends in legal change and frequently refer to each other as persuasive precedent. This Article presents an overview of such positive jurisprudence and focuses on decisions from international, Commonwealth, and United States courts.

  • First Amendment Center

    The First Amendment was written because at America's inception, citizens demanded a guarantee of their basic freedoms. Our blueprint for personal freedom and the hallmark of an open society, the First Amendment protects freedom of speech, press, religion, assembly and petition. Without the First Amendment, religious minorities could be persecuted, the government might well establish a national religion, protesters could be silenced, the press could not criticize government, and citizens could not mobilize for social change.

  • Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act

    This page provides an overview of section 230 of the Communications Decency Act ("Section 230"), an important federal law that provides legal protections to operators of websites and other types of interactive computer services. This page also collects information involving Section 230 from across the Citizen Media Law Project website. You will find background information on Section 230 as well as listings of recent blog posts, lawsuits, and news.

  • Telecommunications Act of 1996

    The Telecommunications Act of 1996 is the first major overhaul of telecommunications law in almost 62 years. The goal of this new law is to let anyone enter any communications business -- to let any communications business compete in any market against any other. The Telecommunications Act of 1996 has the potential to change the way we work, live and learn. It will affect telephone service -- local and long distance, cable programming and other video services, broadcast services and services provided to schools.

Organizations Related to Defamation Law

  • Anti-Defamation League

    The Anti-Defamation League (ADL) is an international Jewish non-governmental organization based in the United States. Describing itself as "the nation's premier civil rights/human relations agency", the ADL states that it "fights anti-Semitism and all forms of bigotry, defends democratic ideals and protects civil rights for all" while it "[advocates] for Israel [...] with policymakers, the media and the public" and "defends the security of Israel and Jews worldwide

  • Inter American Press Association

    The Inter American Press Association (English acronym for Sociedad Interamericana de Prensa, Inc.,) is a nonprofit organization devoted to defending freedom of speech and freedom of the press in the Americas.

  • Student Press Law Center - Libel and Privacy Invasion

    Student journalists can get in trouble when they carelessly collect and/or publish extremely private details or false information about an individual or entity that seriously harms their reputation. Knowing the basics of defamation law, which includes both libel (written defamation) and slander (spoken defamation), and invasion of privacy law can help you avoid such trouble.

Publications Related to Defamation Law

  • First Amendment Library

    In addition to Supreme Court opinions, the library also contains transcripts of select Supreme Court oral arguments and even audio files of some of those arguments. Major historical materials related to the First Amendment are likewise available, as are all of the state constitutional guarantees related to freedom of expression and religion.

  • Media Law Resource Center - Libel and Slander

    Libel and slander are legal claims for false statements of fact about a person that are printed, broadcast, spoken or otherwise communicated to others. Libel generally refers to statements or visual depictions in written or other permanent form, while slander refers to verbal statements and gestures. The term defamation is often used to encompass both libel and slander.




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