Divorce Law




Divorce Definition

Divorce is the termination of a marriage by court judgment. A judicial decree is awarded declaring the marriage to be dissolved. It leaves both spouses free to marry again. Many states refer to it as Dissolution of Marriage. It is also referred to as Absolute Divorce, Divorce from the Bond(s) of Matrimony, Total Divorce and a Matrimonial Action.

Most divorces are obtained by agreement between both parties to the marriage, allowing the couple to progress through the court system fairly quickly and easily, some with and some without legal representation. There is a small percentage, however, that cannot come to a satisfactory agreement regarding termination of their marriage, nor the related issues.

These couples utilize full legal representation and must avail themselves of their states’ legal system in obtaining a divorce and reaching decisions regarding the related issues.

What is Divorce law? This practice area is a subset of Family Law and is dictated by state laws, statutes, rules, codes and common law. Therefore, the laws and procedures can vary greatly from state to state.

Divorce Law includes the following topics and legal areas:

- Child Support: A determination of the monetary obligation parents have for their minor children. This also addresses medical and/or health insurance coverage, school expenses and the like.

- Child Custody and Visitation: Operating in the best interests of the child, it must be decided whether a child of divorce will reside full-time or part-time with each parent, visitation schedules, holiday schedules, parenting time, etc.

- Spousal Support/Alimony/Maintenance: Often one spouse will be required to provide monetary support to the other spouse for a finite period of time. Many factors are involved in determining the type of support that should be awarded, as well as the amount and the length of time it should be paid.

- Division of Property and Debt: Whether a state is a “community-property state” or an “equitable distribution state” is a large factor in determining what is marital property and what is separate property, and how property and debts will be distributed in a divorce proceeding. Other factors, such as spousal support and child support often come into play as well.

- Separation: State law varies on the recognition of legal separations, and how the topics above will be handled when a couple separates and/or when a divorce/dissolution is pending.

The Divorce Law Center on HG.org provides in depth coverage of divorce law, procedures and all its related topics for the individual U.S. States. In addition to all the topics listed above, our Divorce Law Center also offers resources, information and links covering the Fundamentals of Divorce Law; Domestic Partnerships and Civil Unions; Covenant Marriage Law, Legal Grounds for Divorce; Annulment Law; individual State Resource Links and Divorce Law-related Articles.

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Know Your Rights!

  • Can I Get Alimony After My Divorce is Final?

    Sometimes, after a divorce has been finalized and a court has issued its final judgment or decree declaring the marriage severed, one of the spouses finds that they need spousal support.

  • How to Get an Annulment

    For those who have only been married for a short time, the question of whether an annulment is available versus a divorce is a common question.

  • How to Get Divorced Without an Attorney

    Filing for divorce does not have to be a hostile event. If you and your spouse have simply drifted apart and decided it is time to move on, there is no reason that a divorce needs to be a contentious battle full of expensive legal fees. In fact, it is possible to get a divorce on your own without an attorney.

  • The Pros and Cons of an Uncontested Divorce

    Ending a marriage is never a simple process. However, it can be simpler in some situations when the spouses are able to remain civil and agree between themselves how to divide the marital assets, deal with custody and support issues, and handle any other matters.

  • US Divorce Law and Statistics

    If you are going through a divorce, much of the terminology and general process of divorce can be confusing and intimidating. Understanding the fundamental concepts of the American divorce system can help you in navigating through the process of divorce or legal separation.

  • What is Alienation of Affection?

    Divorces are commonly very messy affairs, with hurt feelings and concerns about the future leading former lovers to take very aggressive and hurtful actions against one another. But, when another person is involved, the matter can become even more heated, and in some jurisdictions the adulterer may actually face civil liability under a cause of action called alienation of affection.

  • What is the Difference Between Separation and Divorce?

    Often we use terms like separation and divorce almost interchangeably, but in many jurisdictions these terms can have very different legal significance. Indeed, there are even differences between separation and legal separation.

  • What To Do When You've Decided It's Time To Get A Divorce?

    The decision to end a marriage can be a very complicated one. Emotionally it may be painful, a relief, or a complicated mixture of both sensations. Practically, many things need to take place before the process can be finished and you can begin to move on with your life.

Articles on HG.org Related to Divorce Law

  • How to Tell if You Are Ready for a Divorce
    Issues to review when contemplating a dissolution of marriage.
  • Informing Your Children About Your Divorce
    Planning a divorce? How to tell your children about your divorce.
  • Important Differences Between Enforcement of Spousal Support Orders and Enforcement of Civil Judgments in California
    Spousal support refers to an ongoing series of payments payable to one spouse over a specified duration of time after a divorce. For spousal support to be enforceable under California law, a judgment must first be entered by the court.
  • What Does “Best Interests of the Child” Mean?
    In the objective sense, the term “best interests of the child” pertains to the principles that are used to determine what will be best for a child in a particular circumstance. In general terms, the best interests of the child assessment is used to determine which services and orders will best serve the child.
  • Unlawful Provisions in Premarital Agreements
    it is vital that any attorney drafting a prenuptial agreement know about unlawful provisions. Otherwise, a client may later be unhappy if provisions of a premarital agreement, or an entire premarital agreement, is later deemed to be invalid because of the inclusion of unlawful provisions. In addition to the information provided in this article regarding unlawful provisions, any attorney should be careful that they are complying with the laws in their specific jurisdiction.
  • Performance of California Nursing Home Chains
    Many nursing home chains in California have been shown to underperform when it comes to quality-of-care, staffing, and inspection measures.
  • Parenting Time and the Upcoming Holidays
    The holidays can be stressful - add in the fact that you may be going through a divorce or separation. Here are some helpful hints to guide you through the holidays and parenting time in order to make the holidays pleasant for you and especially your children.
  • Battery Domestic Violence with Strangulation in Las Vegas, Nevada
    Battery domestic violence is a misdemeanor case in Las Vegas Nevada. But a domestic battery by strangulation is taken more seriously and can result in a felony charge.
  • Texas Child Support Modification: Family Law IN Texas
    Top things to consider when seeking legal representation in a Texas Child Support Modification. We also explain the typical costs involved in a Child Support Modification case and important factors worth considering when trying to determine if a family law attorney is going to be a good fit.
  • Evidence Needed for a Family Violence Protective Order
    Seeking a protective order after an instance of family violence can be complex. A protective order can be used to help a victim of family violence feel safer by restricting his or her interactions with the alleged abuser. However, there are several elements that must be proven to ensure a court would approve a protective order.
  • All Family Law Articles

    Articles written by attorneys and experts worldwide discussing legal aspects related to Family Law including: adoption, alimony, child support and custody, child visitation, collaborative law, divorce, domestic violence, elder law, juvenile crime, juvenile law, juvenile probation, paternity, pre-nuptial agreement, separation.

Individual State Divorce Laws

Divorce Law - US

  • ABA - Divorce Law by State

    The Family Law Quarterly publishes these charts in conjunction with the annual "Family Law in the Fifty States Case Digests." The charts summarize basic laws in each state by topic, including custody, alimony and grounds for divorce.

  • ABA - Family Law Section

    The Section of Family Law has over 10,000 lawyer, associate and law student members across the country and worldwide. Our members are dedicated to serving the field of family law in areas such as adoption, divorce, custody, military law, alternative families, and elder law.

  • Divorce and Separation - Overview

    A divorce formally dissolves a legal marriage. While married couples do not possess a constitutional or legal right to divorce, states permit divorces because to do so best serves public policy. To ensure that a particular divorce serves public policy interests, some states require a "cooling-off period," which prescribes a time period after legal separation that spouses must bear before they can initiate divorce proceedings.

  • Divorce Law - Wikipedia

    Divorce or dissolution of marriage is the termination of a marriage, canceling the legal duties and responsibilities of marriage and dissolving the bonds of matrimony between two persons. In most countries, divorce requires the sanction of a judge or other authority in a legal process to complete a divorce. A divorce does not declare a marriage null and void, as in an annulment, but divorce cancels the marital status of the parties, allowing them to marry another.

  • Marriage and Divorce Abroad - US Department of State

    Many U.S. citizens choose to marry, or obtain a divorce while traveling or living abroad. There are things you’ll need to know if you do choose to marry or divorce while out of the U.S. We hope the information below will be helpful to you.

  • State Residency Requirements for Divorce

    Most states require at least one spouse, usually the one filing the divorce petition, to be a resident of the state for a period of time prior to filing for divorce there. Some states require domicile, which means you met a set of standards less demanding than residency requirements to show that you plan to live in the state. Other states require that you be a resident of the state for a specific time period before filing for divorce.

  • Uniform Divorce Recognition Act

    A divorce obtained in another jurisdiction shall be of no force or effect in this state if both parties to the marriage were domiciled in this state at the time the proceeding for the divorce was commenced.

  • Uniform Interstate Family Support Act (UIFSA) Procedural Guidelines

    The Uniform Interstate Family Support Act (UIFSA) is one of the uniform acts drafted by the National Conference of Commissioners on Uniform State Laws. First developed in 1992, the NCCUSL revised the act in 1996 and again in 2001. The act addresses non-payment of child support obligations and limits the jurisdiction that could properly establish and modify child support orders. It has been adopted by every U.S. state. In 1996, Congress passed and President Bill Clinton signed the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Act (42 U.S.C. § 666), which required that states adopt UIFSA by January 1, 1998 or face loss of federal funding for child support enforcement.

Divorce Law - International

  • Canadian Divorce Act

    Divorce in Canada is governed by the Divorce Act. Most divorces in Canada are based on one year separation. Note that 'living separate and apart' does not necessarily mean living in separate homes - you can be separated but share the same home for various reasons (children, money, etc.). For example, let's say that your spouse moved out of the house three months ago. However, your marriage actually broke down and was essentially over nine months ago. Your actual date of separation may be nine months ago, rather than three months ago.

  • International Divorce

    People spend more time overseas than ever before. They might marry a foreign national in one country, parent children in another, and own a business in a third country. Our world is becoming a smaller place and this will have increasing impact on the analysis a matrimonial lawyer must bring to a new case.

Organizations Related to Divorce Law

  • Americans for Divorce Reform

    Americans for Divorce Reform was founded in 1997. We have helped people get involved in the movement for divorce reform through our web site, e-mail lists, radio, print and television interviews. We want to: Tell the public, lawmakers and the media what's wrong with divorce. Help people get involved in state-level efforts to pass divorce reform laws. Give people the information, statistics, analysis and drafting help that they need in order to advocate divorce reform in their states.

  • Divorce HQ

    Collaborative professional organizations are groups of multi-disciplinary professionals committed to resolving divorce cooperatively. The organizations you will find in this directory are not private practices, but rather networks of professionals who have joined together with a mutual commitment to the ideals of the collaborative method of divorce.

  • International Academy of Matrimonial Lawyers

    The IAML is a worldwide association of practising lawyers who are recognised by their peers as the most experienced and expert family law specialists in their respective countries. The Academy was formed in 1986, inspired in part by the success of the American Academy of Matrimonial Lawyers, an organisation founded in 1962 to improve the practice of law and administration of justice in the area of divorce and family law in the USA.

Publications Related to Divorce Law

  • Journal of the International Academy of Matrimonial Lawyers

    The Journal of the International Academy of Matrimonial Lawyers is an on-line law review and digest that endeavors to publish timely articles on family law and related topics, that have not previously been published elsewhere. The Journal is the brainchild of Charles C. Shainberg of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, a Past President of the Academy, and has been in development for over three years.

  • Matrimonial CaseLaw

    Matrimonial CaseLaw provides up-to-date, cross-referenced case notes, citations, analysis, and citable concepts of New York State divorce law.


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