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Changing Legal Job - Quitting Your Legal Employment

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Leaving Your Legal Job

  • Alternative Careers for JD's

    Occasionally, lawyers find themselves at a crossroads in their careers. They reach the conclusion that the practice of law no longer interests them, which raises the question about what they can do with their law degrees besides practicing law.

  • Alternative Legal Careers

    How to search for career opportunities outside the legal field.

  • Creating a Satisfying Second Act in Your Legal Career

    Attorneys are widely perceived as successful in life and many would affirm their satisfaction with their careers. But lawyers who can claim they “couldn’t be happier” are rare, and far more common are those who don’t take time to consider how making changes might yield greater satisfaction.

  • Law Students Demand More from the Profession

    After the better part of a decade in post-law school employment, you might find yourself asking, "Is this all there is?"

  • Leaving a Law Job Without Leaving a Bad Taste

    Some things to consider when leaving your legal job.

  • Leaving your Legal Career Far Behind

    These women went into the law for all of the right reasons -- and some wrong ones -- but then listened to that inner voice.

  • Quitting Your Job - About.com

    People quit their jobs for a variety of reasons. These reasons include a lack of advancement opportunities, they want more money, or simply because they are unhappy. Find out how to decide when to leave your employer and how to do it diplomatically.

  • Resignation Letter Template

    Resignation letter templates, formats, examples, samples and writing tips. Includes resignation letter samples and a resignation letter template that you may download for personal use. Also called a letter of resignation.

Losing Your Job

Legal Career Change

Relocating

  • Job-Seeker Relocation Resources

    Collection of the best relocation and moving tools and resources to assist job-seekers who are considering relocating.

  • Moving Your Career to Another City

    Before you relocate, it is important to distinguish the types of legal professionals that are likely to have the most success in relocating from those who will not have success.

  • New City, New Job: How to Conduct a Long-Distance Job Search

    How do you go about landing a job in a new locale when your current location is far from your destination?

  • Relocating to a New City

    Many lawyers may find themselves in the position where they will have to relocate during some period of their career. Relocation may be necessary for family reasons, to find employment in your desired field or to return home after having attended law school in a different city. Either way there are a few things that one needs to take into consideration when relocating and looking for legal employment.

  • Relocation

    Advice on relocating.

  • Should I Stay or Should I Go?

    What to do when your firm decides to relocate.

Alternative Legal Work Options

Legal Articles Related to Employment and Labor

  • Top 10 Bad Questions to Avoid When Interviewing a Job Applicant
    When interviewing job applicants, there are good questions and bad questions. A good question seeks relevant and helpful information about the person applying for the job and about the applicant’s job qualifications consistent with a business necessity for asking the question.
  • Employees Are Entitled to Paid Sick Leave in California
    Prior to January 1, 2015, employers were not required to offer employees paid sick leave in California. However, with the passage of the Healthy Families Act of 2014, an employee is now entitled to paid sick leave. Beginning on July 1, 2015, an employee who works for an employer for 30 days or more within a calendar year from the beginning of employment is entitled to paid sick leave.
  • Can You Be Fired for Your Social Media Posts?
    Certain speech about work is considered protected activity. Believe it or not, talking about your job on social media may actually be a protected activity under federal law.
  • Can You Be Fired for Incomplete FMLA Paperwork?
    Court decision gives Pennsylvania workers more protection.
  • Does Your Employee Handbook Violate the National Labor Relations ACT?
    Over the past several years, the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) has been taking a more active role in the non-union workplace, including decisions on whether provision of employers’ handbooks or work rules violate the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA).
  • To Hire or Not to Hire: Independent Contractors Versus Employees
    Most of the time, hiring an independent contractor for your business is a means of providing a temporary subject matter expert who can provide some measure of unique support. While some businesses do continue to retain employees of this type that have provided vast contributions to an organization this is not usually the case.
  • Was Job Candidate Turned Down Because He Was Too Old?
    Tech giant facing lawsuit after taking a pass on older job applicant.
  • Disputed Workers' Compensation Claims
    The Workers’ Compensation Act was established to ensure injured workers receive compensation such as wage loss benefits and medical benefits to supplement their income when they are unable to work because of an injury on the job.
  • Change in Pennsylvania Law
    Twenty-five percent of Americans are banned from employment opportunities due to their criminal record, specifically jobs regarding the care-taking of older Americans.
  • 101 of Non-Compete Agreements: Everything You Need to Know about Protecting Your Business
    Today’s advances – technological, scientific, and business – are all driven by competition. As a business owner or an entrepreneur, you’re likely faced with a serious competition that drives you to constantly enhance and update your product and services range. Competition is healthy, as it promotes innovation – but what happens when you find a competitor amongst your own employees?

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