Family Law

Guide to Parental Rights & Obligations

What is Family Law?

Family law consists of a body of statutes and case precedents that govern the legal responsibilities between individuals who share a domestic connection. These cases usually involve parties who are related by blood or marriage, but family law can affect those in more distant or casual relationships as well. Due to the emotionally-charged nature of most family law cases, litigants are strongly advised to retain legal counsel.

The vast majority of family law proceedings come about as a result of the termination of a marriage or romantic relationship. Family law attorneys help their clients file for separation or divorce, alimony, and child custody, visitation, and support. Spouses married a short time may seek an annulment, and special rights may exist between same-sex couples. The division of property at the end of a marriage is also a common issue in family law cases.

With respect to property division at the time of divorce, every state has a comprehensive set of laws in place to determine the rights of the parties. However, couples who do not agree with the default rules in their state can “opt-out” by hiring a lawyer to draft a prenuptial agreement. Absent fraud or duress, courts will enforce these premarital agreements upon divorce, and distribute property and financial support accordingly.

Family law also involves the prevention of physical and emotional abuse. The potential for domestic abuse is not limited to relationships between current or former spouses and their children. Judges will not hesitate to assert jurisdiction to protect an elderly family member, someone in a dating relationship, or even a roommate. When allegations of abuse are made, the court will typically issue a restraining order to prevent further contact.

In a contested family law case, most people understand that hiring a skilled attorney will provide an advantage. An attorney can find assets or income the other party is trying to hide, present arguments regarding child support and visitation, and even take the case to trial if settlement talks fail. Attorney representation is just as crucial in uncontested cases, however. Without it, a party is vulnerable and can unknowingly waive important legal rights.

Parental Rights & Obligations

The issue of child custody is the most common dispute in family court. As should be expected, parents are extremely concerned with the safety, education, and overall wellbeing of their children. Custody decisions become even more difficult following a divorce or breakup, as parents tend to be distrustful of each other at these times. Regardless of the state of affairs between the parents, judges will always decide custody based on “the best interests of the child.”

In an effort to do what is best for the child, the court can assign legal and physical custody to one parent, or these rights can be shared. A typical schedule would allow the child to spend weekends, summers, and alternating holidays with the non-custodial parent, with both parents having an equal say in major decisions affecting the child. When approving a custody schedule, the court will do what it can to avoid unnecessary disruptions to the child’s life.

All parents have a legal duty to provide financial support for their children. The amount of support ordered in a particular case will be calculated according to state statute. Most states publish a child support worksheet that simplifies the task. The calculation will take into account the respective incomes of the parents, the cost of health insurance for the child, support paid for other children by the non-custodial parent, and more.

Custody and support orders are subject to modification. In fact, family law attorneys spend much of their time representing clients in modification proceedings. To alter a visitation schedule or revise the amount of child support, the requesting party must demonstrate that circumstances have changed since the order was entered. Examples of changed circumstances include loss of employment, moving, a parent becoming disabled, etc.

Family law cases can involve a number of other issues. Establishing (or disproving) paternity is a common subject of litigation, although it is becoming less complicated with the ability of courts to order DNA testing. Other issues include the termination of parental rights, adoption, gay and LGBT relations, and grandparent rights. Family law in the 21st century is evolving quickly, making it more important than ever to seek advice from a qualified attorney.


Know your Rights!

  • Creating a Prenuptial Agreement

    It is easy to become wrapped up in the excitement of love and a wedding and to forget about what exactly could be at stake should things go wrong. It may not be terribly romantic, but it could be very wise to think through both the good and the bad of a marriage.

  • How Does a Minor Get Emancipated from His or Her Parents?

    Emancipation allows a a minor to conduct business or hold a job on his or her own behalf, enter into contracts, and otherwise generally be treated as one who had reached the age of majority (i.e., an adult). Whether parental consent is required for emancipation can depend on the circumstances and the jurisdiction.

  • How to Get an Annulment

    In many ways, annulments are no different than divorces. Like a divorce, an annulment is a court order after a proceeding that essentially dissolves a marriage. But, unlike a divorce, an annulment has the legal effect of declaring that the marriage never existed in the first place.

  • Where is Same-Sex Marriage Legal in the United States?

    Same-sex marriage is now legally recognized in several states as well as the federal government for tax and immigration purposes.

Articles About Family Law

  • What Is the Time Limitation for Taking a Child Out of the Country?
    Family law cases can often be emotionally straining. Sometimes, one parent is given primary custody at the objection of the other parent. The non-custodial parent may attempt to become the primary custodian by removing the child from the state or country, making it more difficult for the other parent to find him or her and to enforce the order.
  • Modifications to an Ohio Divorce Decree
    The only constant in life is change, and changes in life circumstances and the lives of your children may warrant a post-decree modification of divorce orders.
  • Division of Business Ownership or Professional Practices in an Ohio Divorce
    How is the marital interest in a spouse’s closely-held business or professional practice established and divided during the course of a divorce or dissolution in Ohio? How do you protect the ongoing operations of the business or the professional practice while ensuring that a spouse receives appropriate compensation for their marital interest in the company or practice?
  • The Difference Between a Dissolution and a Contested Divorce in Ohio
    The two primary legal vehicles to bring a marriage to an end in Ohio are a “dissolution” and a “contested divorce.” The key difference between the two options lies in the resolution of all issues contained within the “Settlement Agreement.”
  • Can I Challenge Final Decision Making Authority?
    In Georgia, a judge can designate or parents can decide on which parent will have final decision making authority. This authority extends to certain important aspects of the child’s life.
  • The Importance of a Prenuptial Agreement
    We live in a culture where marriages are not always “till death do us part.” Although most engaged couples imagine that their marriage will be a lifetime of shared bliss and cooperation with finances, the truth is that approximately 20 percent of marriages end within five years and more than 30 percent end within 10 years. This is why it is important to consider all possibilities for the future before you get married
  • Can I Get a Common Law Marriage License?
    When people get divorced, they may wonder about getting a common law marriage. They may be confused about the differences between traditional marriages and common marriages, especially concerning licenses.
  • Can I Get in Trouble for Not Returning to the United States with My Child from Florida?
    While parents are usually free to move around the country, into other territories owned by the United States and to other parts of the world, their ability to take their children with them may be inhibited. These rights may be restricted if the other parent or individual has a Florida court order pertaining to visitation or shared parenting time.
  • What Are the Questions I Need to Ask My Lawyer in a Child Custody Case?
    Child custody cases can be some of the most contentious. They can also be complex, and the way that they are decided varies from each state and region. To better prepare for a custody dispute, parents may retain the services of family law lawyers to help advise them of the process entailed in a child custody case.
  • Divorce & Parenting Arrangements
    Most parents experiencing a divorce tell me that their primary concern is their children’s best interests. And most of the time I believe them.
  • All Family Law Articles

Family Law - US

  • ABA - Section of Family Law

    American Bar Association Section of Family Law's dedicated lawyers, associates and law students serve as leaders in the field of marital and family law. ABA Section of Family Law offers products and resources for lawyers, students and the public.

  • Administration for Children and Families (ACF)

    The purpose of Administration for Children and Families (ACF) is to ensure the welfare and well-being of the quality of life of children and families. Their programs are aimed at empowering and equipping individuals, families and communities by finding solutions to difficult situations, through assistance, support and caring.

  • Child Welfare Information Gateway

    Child Welfare Information Gateway contributes to protecting children by providing access to, online and offline, resources. The information covers topics related to the welfare of children.

  • Family Law

    Here legal aspects regarding Family Law are addressed. The material and topics include, but are not limited to: living together, marriage, divorce, adoption, child support and more.

  • Family Law - State Statutes

    Family Law legislation differs from State to State. Here the Statues, regarding Family Law across the country.

  • Family Law - Wikipedia

    Family Law is part of the law that deals with relations within the family and issues related thereto. Examples of family law are: the nature and issues arising from a marriage; civil unions and domestic partnerships; mental and physical abuse of the spouse and/or children; legitimacy, adoption, surrogacy and abduction of children; annulment, divorce, alimony and settlements; and custody, visitation and support pertaining to the child.

  • Family Law Organization - Family Law Code by State

    Family Law Organization offers resources to attorneys and parents. These resources include the Family Law Code, attorney database and discussion links.

  • Uniting American Families Act

    The Uniting American Families Act (formerly the Permanent Partners Immigration Act) amends the definition of “spouse” under the U.S. Immigration and Nationality Act. This remedy allows U.S. citizens and legal permanent residents to sponsor their same-sex partners for family-based immigration.

  • US Department of Health and Human Services - Families

    This Department provides essential human services to protect the health of the people. The topics contain information on safety, health insurance and how to improve your own health and the health of your family.

Family Law - International

Organizations Regarding Family Law

Publications Regarding Family Law

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