Industrial Injuries Law

Industrial Injuries Law is most closely related to Workers’ Compensation Law, although, in some instances it can overlap with the practice areas of Personal Injury and Wrongful Death. This area of law originated in an effort to compensate workers who had been injured while performing their job duties. However, in the 1970’s, with the passage of the Occupational Safety and Health Act, the focus started to concentrate more on the prevention of these injuries and on the study of occupational hazards and their long-term effects. This led to the advent of widespread industrial safety programs, which have become a necessary consideration for all types of businesses.

Most industrial injuries generally fall into three categories. Currently, the type becoming most common is repetitive injuries, resulting from ergonomic hazards, and caused by stress due to performing repetitive tasks over a prolonged period of time, as well as improper lifting. The other two categories are characterized by chemical hazards and physical hazards.

Compensation for the majority of industrial injuries is obtained through the filing of workers’ compensation claims. However, in situations where there is proven neglect or other blatant legal violations committed by the employer, the injured worker may be able to seek damages through a personal injury lawsuit instead. And when severe violations result in the death of the worker, it might be possible for the worker’s family to file suit for wrongful death. This area of law, deciding if a worker may sue for damages rather than pursue a workers’ compensation claim, can be murky and is best addressed with the assistance of an experienced Personal Injury or Workers’ Compensation Attorney. Copyright

Industrial Injuries Law - US

  • American National Standards Institute (ANSI)

    As the voice of the U.S. standards and conformity assessment system, the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) empowers its members and constituents to strengthen the U.S. marketplace position in the global economy while helping to assure the safety and health of consumers and the protection of the environment.

  • Best Manufacturing Practices (BMP) Program

    The Best Manufacturing Practices (BMP) Program was created in 1985 to help businesses identify, research, and promote exceptional manufacturing practices, methods, and procedures. Its objective is to empower defense and commercial customers to operate at a higher level of efficiency and effectiveness. To this end, BMP has three core competencies represented by tools and resources that enable organizations to identify and apply best practices and become part of a vast, mutually supportive information exchange network:

  • Bureau of Industry and Security

    BIS Mission: Advance U.S. national security, foreign policy, and economic objectives by ensuring an effective export control and treaty compliance system and promoting continued U.S. strategic technology leadership.

  • Convention on the Transboundary Effects of Industrial Accidents - United Nations Economic Commission

    Since the early 1990s the United Nations Economic Commission for Europe has concentrated its efforts on preventing industrial accidents and especially their transboundary effects in its region, which stretches from Canada and the United States in the west to the Russian Federation in the east. Its work led to the adoption of the Convention on the Transboundary Effects of Industrial Accidents. It was signed by 26 UN/ECE member countries and the European Union and entered into force on 19 April 2000.

  • Industrial Safety Equipment Association

    This standard is a revision of American National Standard Requirements for Protective Headwear for Industrial Workers, ANSI 289.1-1981. After a careful review, Accredited Standards Committee on Industrial Helmets, 289, decided that the interests of the industrial safety community would be best served by revising ANSI 289.1-1981 to allow innovation, particularly in retention systems.

  • Injuries, Illnesses, and Fatalities (IIF) Program

    The Injuries, Illnesses, and Fatalities (IIF) program provides annual information on the rate and number of work related injuries, illnesses, and fatal injuries, and how these statistics vary by incident, industry, geography, occupation, and other characteristics.

  • National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH)

    The mission of NIOSH is to generate new knowledge in the field of occupational safety and health and to transfer that knowledge into practice for the betterment of workers. To accomplish this mission, NIOSH conducts scientific research, develops guidance and authoritative recommendations, disseminates information, and responds to requests for workplace health hazard evaluations.

  • Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970

    An Act to assure safe and healthful working conditions for working men and women; by authorizing enforcement of the standards developed under the Act; by assisting and encouraging the States in their efforts to assure safe and healthful working conditions; by providing for research, information, education, and training in the field of occupational safety and health; and for other purposes.

  • Occupational Safety and Health Standards - Hazardous Materials

    This section contains requirements for preventing or minimizing the consequences of catastrophic releases of toxic, reactive, flammable, or explosive chemicals. These releases may result in toxic, fire or explosion hazards.

  • OSHA - Regulations (Standards - 29 CFR)

    With the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970, Congress created the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) to ensure safe and healthful working conditions for working men and women by setting and enforcing standards and by providing training, outreach, education and assistance.

Organizations Related to Industrial Injuries Law

  • Chemical Safety Board

    The CSB is an independent federal agency charged with investigating industrial chemical accidents. Headquartered in Washington, DC, the agency's board members are appointed by the President and confirmed by the Senate.

  • International Association of Industrial Accident Boards and Commissions (IAIABC)

    The International Association of Industrial Accident Boards & Commissions (IAIABC) is a not-for-profit trade association representing government agencies charged with the administration of workers' compensation systems throughout the United States, Canada, and other nations and territories.

  • Office of Hazardous Materials Safety (OHMS)

    The Pipeline and Hazardous Material Safety Administration Office of Hazardous Materials Safety (OHMS) is the Federal safety authority for ensuring the safe transport of hazardous materials (hazmat) by air, rail, highway, and water, with the exception of bulk transportation of hazmat by vessel. OHMS promulgates a national safety program to minimize the risks to life and property inherent in commercial transportation of hazardous materials.

Publications Related to Industrial Injuries Law

  • Consumer Product Safety Commission

    The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission is charged with protecting the public from unreasonable risks of serious injury or death from thousands of types of consumer products under the agency's jurisdiction. The CPSC is committed to protecting consumers and families from products that pose a fire, electrical, chemical, or mechanical hazard or can injure children.

  • Occupational Injury and Illness Classification System

    The mission of NIOSH is to generate new knowledge in the field of occupational safety and health and to transfer that knowledge into practice for the betterment of workers. To accomplish this mission, NIOSH conducts scientific research, develops guidance and authoritative recommendations, disseminates information, and responds to requests for workplace health hazard evaluations.

  • Safety Info

    The safety library is designed to provide a resource for developing, maintaining and improving your company safety program.

Articles on Related to Industrial Injuries Law

  • Steps for Filing a Workers' Comp Claim
    When a worker is hospitalized in connection with an injury sustained on the job, they are unable to work. Other injuries may be less serious but still hinder the ability of a worker to complete his or her duties.
  • Work-Related Car Accidents
    Some workers drive for a living while others may only occasionally do so to complete a work-related task. Under either scenario – in the event of a workplace car accident – injuries sustained by an employee can form the basis of a successful Workers’ Compensation claim.
  • Can I File for Workers Compensation and Personal Injury Against the Same Employer?
    If you were injured on the job, you are entitled to restitution through workers compensation insurance. Typically, employees will file an accident report prior to filing their workers compensation claim. At that point, the injured worker is entitled to receive a portion of his or her wages, in addition to medical care until reaching the maximum level of recovery.
  • Successful Workers’ Compensation Claim
    When an employee is injured in the workplace, he or she is typically eligible for Workers’ Compensation benefits to cover lost wages and medical expenses. Depending on the nature of the injury, Workers’ Compensation claims can be very expensive for insurance companies.
  • Workers' Compensation Laws in Pennsylvania
    Suffering a work-related injury in Pennsylvania is no doubt a life-changing experience for workers and their family members. The costly medical bills and time spent out of work can have a significant financial impact, as can losing a family member who was a primary earner.
  • Medical-Only Workers’ Compensation Claims
    Recently, the Pennsylvania Commonwealth Court issued a decision affecting how a claimant must file when an initial Workers’ Compensation claim is accepted as medical-only but later results in a compensable wage loss situation.
  • Benefits for Amputations
    When workers experience a serious injury, such as an amputation of a finger, they can pursue a Workers’ Compensation claim for wages lost and a lump sum award due to a “specific loss.”
  • New Florida Workers’ Compensation Bill Will Change Penalties
    There’s a new workers’ compensation bill in the Florida Senate, and if it is enacted, it will make some serious changes. It’s argued that the changes will do a few things, including make sure that businesses are not shut down needlessly when it’s discovered that they are not carrying insurance, and it will offer tougher penalties as is increases the actual fine multiplier from 1.5 times to 2 times.
  • Child Support Payments
    How does an obligation to pay child support impact someone’s right to workers’ compensation benefits?
  • Workplace Injury Claims through Civil Lawsuits
    Can an injured worker pursue a claim for pain and suffering through a civil lawsuit alleging negligence; or is the injured worker limited to just a claim for workers’ compensation benefits?
  • All Tort and Personal Injury Law Articles

    Articles written by attorneys and experts worldwide discussing legal aspects related to Tort and Personal Injury including: animal bites, asbestos mesothelioma, back and neck injury, bicycle accident, birth injury, brain injury, burn injuries, catastrophic injuries, construction accidents, construction injuries, defamation, libel and slander, defective products, industrial injuries, mass tort, negligence, nursing home abuse, pedestrian accident, personal injury, premises liability, product liability, sexual abuse, slip and fall, spinal cord injury, torts, toxic mold, toxic torts, workplace injuries and wrongful death.

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