Industrial Injuries Law




Industrial Injuries Law is most closely related to Workers’ Compensation Law, although, in some instances it can overlap with the practice areas of Personal Injury and Wrongful Death. This area of law originated in an effort to compensate workers who had been injured while performing their job duties. However, in the 1970’s, with the passage of the Occupational Safety and Health Act, the focus started to concentrate more on the prevention of these injuries and on the study of occupational hazards and their long-term effects. This led to the advent of widespread industrial safety programs, which have become a necessary consideration for all types of businesses.

Most industrial injuries generally fall into three categories. Currently, the type becoming most common is repetitive injuries, resulting from ergonomic hazards, and caused by stress due to performing repetitive tasks over a prolonged period of time, as well as improper lifting. The other two categories are characterized by chemical hazards and physical hazards.

Compensation for the majority of industrial injuries is obtained through the filing of workers’ compensation claims. However, in situations where there is proven neglect or other blatant legal violations committed by the employer, the injured worker may be able to seek damages through a personal injury lawsuit instead. And when severe violations result in the death of the worker, it might be possible for the worker’s family to file suit for wrongful death. This area of law, deciding if a worker may sue for damages rather than pursue a workers’ compensation claim, can be murky and is best addressed with the assistance of an experienced Personal Injury or Workers’ Compensation Attorney. Copyright HG.org


Industrial Injuries Law Articles

  • Chef Nearly Loses Hand in Machine Accident
    Compared to jobs in construction and law enforcement, most people do not regard working in a kitchen as extremely dangerous. However, whenever a job requires use of heavy or small equipment, there is the risk of a serious machine accident.
  • When Is an Employee’s Commute Covered by Workers’ Compensation?
    In most cases, if someone is injured in a car accident on their way to work, their injuries are not covered under their employer’s Workers’ Compensation plan.
  • Invisible Work Injuries
    When a person is wearing a cast or using crutches to get around, it is clear to others that the person has been injured. However, sometimes the most painful injuries are those that cannot be detected just by looking at the person.
  • Michael Massey’s Law in Pennsylvania
    Work injuries can be debilitating and in some cases, may even end in death. Under Workers’ Compensation laws in New Jersey and Pennsylvania, victims of workplace accidents are entitled to benefits regardless of who was at fault.
  • The Uncertain Future of Impairment Rating Evaluations (IREs) in PA Workers’ Compensation System
    Impairment rating evaluations (IRE) are an important Workers’ Compensation tool for employers in Pennsylvania. Employers have little recourse when it comes to providing benefits for employees who do not make a full recovery and whose return to work after in illness or injury is in doubt.
  • Workers’ Compensation
    In many professions, day-to-day tasks involve some level of risk that could result in injury or illness. The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) reported that on the job illness and injuries that resulted in time away from work affected approximately 1.2 million individuals in 2015.
  • Legal Options after a Work Injury
    We would like to think our employers take every necessary precaution to keep us safe at work, but unfortunately, this is not always the case. Sometimes companies put workers in harm’s way through their negligent actions.
  • Aviation Accidents
    The aviation industry is vast and requires large numbers of workers across a broad range of jobs to keep it running smoothly.
  • Woman Who Lost Leg at Work During Momentary Break Can Receive Benefits
    In an important decision for Workers’ Compensation law, a ruled that a woman who lost her leg on the job is entitled to benefits, even if she was not performing a job task at the time of her accident.
  • Expert Witness Explains Confined Space Hazards
    Confined spaces are dangerous to many individuals for numerous reasons, but when the individual is trapped and unable to exit the location, he or she may become injured or suffer oxygen deprivation and other complications. Industrial and construction areas are frequently full of hazards that could confine a person in a small space if he or she is not paying attention to his or her surroundings.
  • All Tort and Personal Injury Law Articles

    Articles written by attorneys and experts worldwide discussing legal aspects related to Tort and Personal Injury including: animal bites, asbestos mesothelioma, back and neck injury, bicycle accident, birth injury, brain injury, burn injuries, catastrophic injuries, construction accidents, construction injuries, defamation, libel and slander, defective products, industrial injuries, mass tort, negligence, nursing home abuse, pedestrian accident, personal injury, premises liability, product liability, sexual abuse, slip and fall, spinal cord injury, torts, toxic mold, toxic torts, workplace injuries and wrongful death.

Industrial Injuries Law - US

  • American National Standards Institute (ANSI)

    As the voice of the U.S. standards and conformity assessment system, the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) empowers its members and constituents to strengthen the U.S. marketplace position in the global economy while helping to assure the safety and health of consumers and the protection of the environment.

  • Best Manufacturing Practices (BMP) Program

    The Best Manufacturing Practices (BMP) Program was created in 1985 to help businesses identify, research, and promote exceptional manufacturing practices, methods, and procedures. Its objective is to empower defense and commercial customers to operate at a higher level of efficiency and effectiveness. To this end, BMP has three core competencies represented by tools and resources that enable organizations to identify and apply best practices and become part of a vast, mutually supportive information exchange network:

  • Bureau of Industry and Security

    BIS Mission: Advance U.S. national security, foreign policy, and economic objectives by ensuring an effective export control and treaty compliance system and promoting continued U.S. strategic technology leadership.

  • Convention on the Transboundary Effects of Industrial Accidents - United Nations Economic Commission

    Since the early 1990s the United Nations Economic Commission for Europe has concentrated its efforts on preventing industrial accidents and especially their transboundary effects in its region, which stretches from Canada and the United States in the west to the Russian Federation in the east. Its work led to the adoption of the Convention on the Transboundary Effects of Industrial Accidents. It was signed by 26 UN/ECE member countries and the European Union and entered into force on 19 April 2000.

  • Industrial Safety Equipment Association

    This standard is a revision of American National Standard Requirements for Protective Headwear for Industrial Workers, ANSI 289.1-1981. After a careful review, Accredited Standards Committee on Industrial Helmets, 289, decided that the interests of the industrial safety community would be best served by revising ANSI 289.1-1981 to allow innovation, particularly in retention systems.

  • Injuries, Illnesses, and Fatalities (IIF) Program

    The Injuries, Illnesses, and Fatalities (IIF) program provides annual information on the rate and number of work related injuries, illnesses, and fatal injuries, and how these statistics vary by incident, industry, geography, occupation, and other characteristics.

  • National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH)

    The mission of NIOSH is to generate new knowledge in the field of occupational safety and health and to transfer that knowledge into practice for the betterment of workers. To accomplish this mission, NIOSH conducts scientific research, develops guidance and authoritative recommendations, disseminates information, and responds to requests for workplace health hazard evaluations.

  • Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970

    An Act to assure safe and healthful working conditions for working men and women; by authorizing enforcement of the standards developed under the Act; by assisting and encouraging the States in their efforts to assure safe and healthful working conditions; by providing for research, information, education, and training in the field of occupational safety and health; and for other purposes.

  • Occupational Safety and Health Standards - Hazardous Materials

    This section contains requirements for preventing or minimizing the consequences of catastrophic releases of toxic, reactive, flammable, or explosive chemicals. These releases may result in toxic, fire or explosion hazards.

  • OSHA - Regulations (Standards - 29 CFR)

    With the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970, Congress created the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) to ensure safe and healthful working conditions for working men and women by setting and enforcing standards and by providing training, outreach, education and assistance.

Industrial Injuries Law Publications

  • Consumer Product Safety Commission

    The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission is charged with protecting the public from unreasonable risks of serious injury or death from thousands of types of consumer products under the agency's jurisdiction. The CPSC is committed to protecting consumers and families from products that pose a fire, electrical, chemical, or mechanical hazard or can injure children.

  • Occupational Injury and Illness Classification System

    The mission of NIOSH is to generate new knowledge in the field of occupational safety and health and to transfer that knowledge into practice for the betterment of workers. To accomplish this mission, NIOSH conducts scientific research, develops guidance and authoritative recommendations, disseminates information, and responds to requests for workplace health hazard evaluations.

  • Safety Info

    The safety library is designed to provide a resource for developing, maintaining and improving your company safety program.

Industrial Injuries Law Organizations

  • Chemical Safety Board

    The CSB is an independent federal agency charged with investigating industrial chemical accidents. Headquartered in Washington, DC, the agency's board members are appointed by the President and confirmed by the Senate.

  • International Association of Industrial Accident Boards and Commissions (IAIABC)

    The International Association of Industrial Accident Boards & Commissions (IAIABC) is a not-for-profit trade association representing government agencies charged with the administration of workers' compensation systems throughout the United States, Canada, and other nations and territories.

  • Office of Hazardous Materials Safety (OHMS)

    The Pipeline and Hazardous Material Safety Administration Office of Hazardous Materials Safety (OHMS) is the Federal safety authority for ensuring the safe transport of hazardous materials (hazmat) by air, rail, highway, and water, with the exception of bulk transportation of hazmat by vessel. OHMS promulgates a national safety program to minimize the risks to life and property inherent in commercial transportation of hazardous materials.




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