Maritime Law

Maritime law, also referred to as admiralty law, consists of the statutes and case precedents that govern legal disputes originating on navigable waters. Navigable waters include all bodies of water that are capable of being used for interstate or foreign commerce. Thus, a large river that flows into the ocean or crosses state lines would fall within maritime jurisdiction. A lake entirely within a single state would not.

Expert Witnesses

Admiralty and Maritime Lawyers in the USA


Admiralty and Maritime Lawyers in the USA ► Other Countries




Admiralty and Maritime Lawyers USA - Recent Legal Articles

  • Costa Concordia Cruise Ship Accident

    Perhaps one of the most prolific – and horrendous – cruise ship accidents in recent memory was the January 2012 sinking of the Costa Concordia. When the ship ran aground off the cost of Italy, 4,200 passengers and crew members were forced to evacuate. Unfortunately, dozens of passengers were injured and a yet-still-unknown number killed.

  • Can I Get Breathalyzed On My Boat?
      by HG.org

    Most of us are familiar with the concept of driving under the influence (DUI) or driving while impaired (DWI), but how do these translate to boating? Is it illegal to boat while drunk? If one is cited for boating under the influence, will that affect their driving license? Can you be given a breathalyzer on your boat?

  • What is a Flag of Convenience?
      by HG.org

    When registering a vessel for international travel, one must choose a nation under the flag of which that vessel will sail. The term “flag of convenience” refers to registering a ship in a sovereign state different from that of the ship's owners.

  • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Report Reveals Health Problems Aboard Cruise Ship.

    Recently, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (“CDC”) released additional inspection reports for its Vessel Sanitation Program (“VSP”), which is designed to assist the cruise ship industry in preventing and controlling introduction, transmission, and spread of gastrointestinal illnesses, i.e. food poisoning, on cruise ships.

  • What to do After a Boating Accident
      by HG.org

    If you or someone you know has been in a boating accident, you understand how scary the whole event can be. Not only is someone injured, a boat may be damaged, and there may have been a very real fear of drowning as part of the accident. This can lead to long-term anguish and other injuries. Moreover, since it is not the familiar scenario of a car accident, who is responsible? Who do you report the accident to, if anyone? Is there insurance coverage? Who is liable?

  • Cruise Ship Claims
      by HG.org

    A vacation aboard a cruise ship can be a memorable experience, an affordable, all-inclusive vacation option, and a great way to see exotic ports of call. But, what happens when something goes wrong and your memories end up being of sickness, injury, inadequate medical care, fire, being stranded, crime, or even the wrongful death of a loved one?

  • Difference between Jones Act and Workers’ Compensation Claim

    Workers’ compensation and Jones Act maritime injury claims are very different. The only similarity is that they provide compensation for injured employees.

  • Settling a Jones Act Claim Out of Court

    There are times when settling a Jones Act claim out of court may lead to more compensation and ultimately be the best option for an injured maritime worker.

  • An Overview of the Maritime Ports and Waterways Safety Program

    The federal Ports and Waterways Safety Program establishes rules for safe operation of vessels. Violations may result in injury or death of a maritime worker.

  • Legal Options for Maritime Employees Not Covered Under the Jones Act

    Even when maritime employees don’t meet the Jones Act claim requisites for a maritime accident, there’re still other legal options available through a Louisiana maritime lawyer.


Find a Local Lawyer