Maritime Law

Maritime law, also referred to as admiralty law, consists of the statutes and case precedents that govern legal disputes originating on navigable waters. Navigable waters include all bodies of water that are capable of being used for interstate or foreign commerce. Thus, a large river that flows into the ocean or crosses state lines would fall within maritime jurisdiction. A lake entirely within a single state would not.

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All Articles »Admiralty and Maritime Lawyers USA - Recent Legal Articles

  • Maritime Law and Tugboat Accidents
      by HG.org

    Tugboat work has a lot of danger to those that work with them. The labor is intensive, and there may be the problem of accidents occurring in or around them. Weather becomes a factor that may cause severe perilous conditions, and persons with spots in the vessel might become injured through colliding ships. Cables, winches and lines often cause situations that may lead to harm to individuals involved. Death is a possible outcome when handling these types of jobs.

  • The Real Risks Offshore Workers Face on a Daily Basis

    Offshore workers face numerous risks on a daily basis. When these risks lead to on-the-job injuries, the physical, financial and emotional consequences can be devastating for injured workers and their families.

  • Your Rights after a Tugboat Accident

    If you were injured on a tugboat, it is important to speak with an experienced maritime attorney about your rights. The Jones Act, maritime negligence laws and the law of unseaworthiness may all entitle you to financial compensation.

  • Caution: Boating in Florida May Be Fun, but Know the Risks

    Summer is the time of year when people usually think about all the time they plan to spend outside enjoying the weather and spending more time with their family. While Florida’s climate allows for outdoor activity year round, there is still an emphasis on doing more during this season, now that children are out of school. Many of these activities happen on or around water due to the state’s geography, and as a result, Florida has one of the highest levels of boat ownership in the country.

  • The Zone of Special Danger Doctrine and the Defense Base Act

    The Zone of Special Danger Doctrine has been the subject of numerous lawsuits under the Longshore & Harbor Workers' Compensation Act, and the Defense Base Act. What is it? How have the courts applied it to claims? Where did it originate?

  • Commercial Fisherman and the Jones Act

    Many in the commercial fishing industry are prone to a high frequency of injuries and even death. The most common causes of injury and fatalities on commercial fishing vessels occur due to falling overboard, drowning, hypothermia, and equipment malfunctions. Most fishermen don’t realize that the Jones Act covers them when they suffer injuries at sea. Fishermen and other seamen that suffer injuries at sea are not covered by the traditional workers’ compensation laws.

  • Cruise Ship Injury During a Shore Excursion: Who is Responsible?

    Cruise Ship companies, such as Holland America, can be held liable for injuries that occur during shore excursions.

  • Suing Owners of Vessels and Limited Liability

    Under the Jones Act, an individual who suffers injuries while working at sea is entitled to sue the employer and owner of the vessel for injuries that are the result of negligence. The individual working at sea is called a “seaman” and individuals who are crew members to captains of vessels fall into this category. Even part-time seamen who spend 30 percent of their time at sea qualify under the act. There are multiple ways where vessel owners will try to limit their liability.

  • Top 10 Causes of Boating Accidents

    Keep yourself safe while boating and avoid these common reasons for boating accidents.

  • Can You be a "Seaman" and Covered under LHWCA at the Same Time?

    In Maritime law, I have personally witnessed crew members of a vessel receiving benefits under the LHWCA while seeking a lawyer for maintenance and cure under the Jones Act. Many lawyers incorrectly assume classification as a "Longshore Harbor Worker" excludes "Seaman" status under the Jones Act. While this would seem a logical inference, logic does not live in a vacuum. With changing circumstances, an inference can change.


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