Maritime Law

Maritime law, also referred to as admiralty law, consists of the statutes and case precedents that govern legal disputes originating on navigable waters. Navigable waters include all bodies of water that are capable of being used for interstate or foreign commerce. Thus, a large river that flows into the ocean or crosses state lines would fall within maritime jurisdiction. A lake entirely within a single state would not.

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All Articles »Admiralty and Maritime Lawyers USA - Recent Legal Articles

  • Suing Owners of Vessels and Limited Liability

    Under the Jones Act, an individual who suffers injuries while working at sea is entitled to sue the employer and owner of the vessel for injuries that are the result of negligence. The individual working at sea is called a “seaman” and individuals who are crew members to captains of vessels fall into this category. Even part-time seamen who spend 30 percent of their time at sea qualify under the act. There are multiple ways where vessel owners will try to limit their liability.

  • Top 10 Causes of Boating Accidents

    Keep yourself safe while boating and avoid these common reasons for boating accidents.

  • Can You be a "Seaman" and Covered under LHWCA at the Same Time?

    In Maritime law, I have personally witnessed crew members of a vessel receiving benefits under the LHWCA while seeking a lawyer for maintenance and cure under the Jones Act. Many lawyers incorrectly assume classification as a "Longshore Harbor Worker" excludes "Seaman" status under the Jones Act. While this would seem a logical inference, logic does not live in a vacuum. With changing circumstances, an inference can change.

  • New 5th Circuit Case Affects Rights of Seaman Injured while at Sea

    Maintenance and cure are damages that have been recognized in Admiralty law for hundreds of years. Maintenance and cure damages allow for support of a seaman who was injured or falls ill while at sea. The support must be paid by the employer. What happens if the seaman falsely reported that he had no pre-existing injuries to his employer on his job application? Can the employer seek restitution for money paid for injuries the seaman failed to disclose? This article addresses these questions.

  • Questions about Admiralty or Maritime Law

    Learn if you qualify for Admiralty or Maritime Law if you have been injured while serving upon a boat in navigable waters.

  • Injured While Water Skiing, Who Is Liable?
      by HG.org

    Water skiiing is a lot of fun. The thrill of “standing” on the water, whizzing along at incredible speeds, and the inevitable splash at the end. But, what happens when something goes wrong and someone is injured while out there water skiing?

  • Sick or Injured After a Cruise, What Can I Do?
      by HG.org

    A cruise vacation is supposed to be a relaxing, enjoyable experience. But, they do not always end that way. An increasing number of passengers in recent years have experienced illness or injuries while on their vacation. Often, this has been the fault of the cruise line, itself. If this happens, what can you do?

  • Costa Concordia Cruise Ship Accident

    Perhaps one of the most prolific – and horrendous – cruise ship accidents in recent memory was the January 2012 sinking of the Costa Concordia. When the ship ran aground off the cost of Italy, 4,200 passengers and crew members were forced to evacuate. Unfortunately, dozens of passengers were injured and a yet-still-unknown number killed.

  • Can I Get Breathalyzed On My Boat?
      by HG.org

    Most of us are familiar with the concept of driving under the influence (DUI) or driving while impaired (DWI), but how do these translate to boating? Is it illegal to boat while drunk? If one is cited for boating under the influence, will that affect their driving license? Can you be given a breathalyzer on your boat?

  • What is a Flag of Convenience?
      by HG.org

    When registering a vessel for international travel, one must choose a nation under the flag of which that vessel will sail. The term “flag of convenience” refers to registering a ship in a sovereign state different from that of the ship's owners.


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