Adoption Law

Adoption law provides a means for parents to voluntarily assume the legal rights and responsibilities of a child not born to them. Following an adoption, all legal ties between the child and the birth parents are permanently severed. The new adoptive parents and the child are treated just like a natural family in the eyes of the law. The adoptive parents decide important matters involving medical treatment, education, and religion, as well as ordinary day-to-day issues that arise in the childís life.

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  • Illinois Adoptees Can Receive Original Birth Certificates Thanks to Illinois Adoption Law

    Relatively new laws in the Illinois legislature have made it easier for persons who have been adopted to receive their original birth certificates. Both adoptees and surrendered persons born in Illinois may request a non-certified copy of their original birth certificate.

  • Making the Decision to Adopt

    There are many questions you need to ask yourself before making the life-changing decision to adopt a child.

  • What Are the Possible Legal Issues Related to Sperm Donors?
      by HG.org

    More and more Americans are turning to in vitro fertilization as a means of conceiving. Sometimes the sperm donor for these procedures is known, sometimes he is not. In either instance, what are the possible legal issues related to both the mother and biological father as the sperm donor?

  • Surrogacy and the Law
      by HG.org

    There are thousands of people who would love the opportunity to have a child of their own but, for whatever reason, are not able to do so. Many of these parents turn to adoption, but some would still like to have a child that is biologically their own. For these parents, surrogacy can sometimes be an option. But what are the laws related to surrogacy? How does the process work? What does one need to think about when considering using a surrogate?

  • What is the Difference Between Adoption and Guardianship?
      by HG.org

    When accepting responsibility for the welfare of a child, there are many difficult questions to consider. But one that often confuses people is the difference between adoption and guardianship. Does one have to adopt a child in order to act like a parent and be responsible for the child, or is there a simpler way?

  • Case of Baby Veronica Is a Primer on Not Just Adoption Law, but Native American Affairs
      by HG.org

    So-Called Baby Veronica is now four years old, and has already been the subject of a case that has traveled all the way to the US Supreme Court and back down through several state courts. The case is a twisting tangle of different legal principles intermingled with social policies, making for a great primer on both adoption laws and Native American affairs.

  • Understanding New Jersey Adoption Process
      by HG.org

    Are you a New Jersey resident considering adoption? Or are you involved in a dispute trying to prevent someone else from adopting your child? In either case, it is important to understand the process of adoption and its legal ramifications.

  • Do Grandparents and Other Family Members Have Visitation Rights
      by HG.org

    The concept of grandparent visitation rights is a fairly new one. Historically, only parents could ask for visitation rights, but now states allow a variety of different family members to ask for visitation of related children. Below is a brief state-by-state summary of grandparent visitation rights as of the date of publication of this article. Should you have a question regarding visitation rights, you should contact a local family law attorney.

  • Adoption in California

    Many types of adoption may be completed in the state of California, including private adoptions, agency adoptions, stepparent or foster parent adoptions, single parent adoptions, and grandparent adoptions.

  • Gay Adoption in Georgia

    After banning Gay Marriage with a constitutional amendment in 2004, Georgia joined 15 other states in drafting bills to outlaw Gay Adoption in 2006 (USA Today). Luckily, it didnít pass. However, nothing in Georgia Family Law explicitly says that you can adopt either.


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