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Business Litigation Lawyers USA - Recent Legal Articles

  • Georgia Court of Appeals Denies Grading Contractors' Claims

    A grading subcontractor was not paid for putting in the roads in a new subdivision; after the construction lender foreclosed upon the project developer, the subcontractor sought payment from the bank. After the trial court awarded the subcontractor its full claim plus attorneys fees, the Georgia Court of Appeals reversed. Some very important lessons for subcontractors and lien claimants are made clear in the ruling.

  • 8 Simple Changes To Improve Your Construction Contracts

    In today's cut-and-paste world, even leading contract attorneys make mistakes. If you want to make your contracts easier to read and promote a problem-free project, then consider implementing some of the changes which we have suggested here.

  • Don't Make a Mistake--Read Your Contract

    Last week, the Georgia Court of Appeals rendered a decision which is detrimental to subcontractor who do not thoroughly read and understand their construction contracts. The contract included a provision which made the individual signing the contract on behalf of the subcontract company personally liable for the contract's performance. The court permitted this provision to be enforced against the signatory.

  • Is ASC Litigation on the Rise?

    In this article we will take a look at the current climate for free-standing, independently-owned physician surgery centers predominately in New Jersey, but affecting many areas of the country, and why it may be the harbinger for increased litigation to come. We’ll highlight a few of the recurring legal issues which tend to arise and take a look at some of the more common and fertile areas for litigation.

  • Love Hurts, and so Can Confidentiality

    When you agree to say nothing to anyone, say nothing. To anyone.

  • What Should I Do When I Have Been Served With a Lawsuit?

    Being served with a lawsuit whether the lawsuit is against you personally or against your business is a stressful thing. While the summons and complaint give you instructions on your deadline to respond to the complaint, those instructions are not complete. This article will help you remain calm when you are served with a lawsuit in Georgia by providing you with more detail on your rights after you have been served.

  • Review of The Owner/Design Professional Agreement from The Design Professional's Perspective

    This article reviews some of the issues addressed in a standard Owner/Design Professional Agreement, outlines concerns from the Design Professional’s perspective, and discusses how the Design Professional can reduce liability on a project and ensure equitable adjustments to the contract price and schedule for changed or additional design services. The agreement contemplated by this article is one to be used as part of a traditional design-bid-build approach.

  • Lack Of Complete Diversity Of Citizenship Of Members Of Equine LLCs Requires Dismissal Of Federal Action

    The issue of diversity of citizenship is of particular interest to equine ownership and contract disputes, because many equine-related entities are organized as limited liability companies (LLCs). The citizenship of LLCs is subject to a different rule than the citizenship of corporations, a distinction that may escape the attention of attorneys.

  • Understanding E-Discovery
      by HG.org

    Few changes to the rules of procedure have been as groundbreaking as those pertaining to discovery of electronically stored media, or e-discovery. Although e-discovery has been slow to make much impact on some areas of legal practice, its effects on litigation are beginning to spread to even the most simple of cases, requiring more and more people to form at least a basic understanding of what it is, how it works, and what their obligations could be in a lawsuit.

  • Suggestions for Those About to Take Part in a Deposition
      by HG.org

    The purpose of a discovery deposition is for an attorney or a party in a case to find out as much as they can about the facts of a law suit. If you are a party to the case, you will likely have a good idea of what to expect, ideally through the advice of your attorney. But, if you are either unrepresented or not a party to a case, this guide should help you understand how to behave, what is at stake, and what your obligations are.


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