Collaborative Law

Collaborative law refers to a new method of solving legal disputes that avoids traditional court proceedings. Rather than filing a lawsuit, each side voluntarily agrees to a series of sit-down negotiations between the parties, their attorneys, and any number of experts and therapists trained in the subject matter of the dispute.

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All Articles »Collaborative Law Lawyers USA - Recent Legal Articles

  • Don't Make These Mistakes in Your Divorce

    Every divorce is different. The parties to a divorce have different needs and expectations. But across the board, any person going through a divorce should avoid these mistakes.

  • Texas Divorce Mediation

    Divorce can be hard on both the divorcing parties’ emotions and their wallets. For those in Williamson County, there is an alternative to traditional divorce litigation which may ease the emotional strain of a divorce and can be more cost effective in comparison to the traditional divorce process. That alternative is mediation.

  • The Single Worst Advice You Could Ever Get About a Custody Fight

    Look at that picture. That used to be you- happy family, good friends, cute kids. But somehow, it all fell apart and you find yourself where you never thought you would be - in the custody fight of your life. It’s simple really; most of us have a few really primal urges- things we just instinctively care about. For most of us, those include breathing, eating, and sleeping. For parents, that list usually expands to include caring for your children.

  • What Is an Incorporated Settlement Agreement in Divorce?
      by HG.org

    In divorce orders and separation agreements, there may be terms such as “merged,” “survived” or “incorporated” that individuals without a legal background may not understand. However, these terms have very specific meanings and can have a big impact on the divorce.

  • Special Considerations for Gray Divorces
      by HG.org

    When a couple gets divorced later in life, this is dubbed a “gray divorce.” Older individuals often have different issues to deal with during the divorce process than individuals of other age brackets. These special considerations include:

  • Basics of Pennsylvania Family Law Litigation

    What does “going to court” mean? That depends on whether you’re referring to the world of prime-time television (L.A. Law for my generation) or the real world of family law litigation. On prime-time television, it means filing an action and a short time later having a full hearing before a judge with everything wrapped up within an hour. The real world is much different.

  • How to Modify a Child Custody Agreement in Texas

    Sometimes, a situation may arise that calls for parents to modify a custody agreement. However, making modifications to your child custody agreement is not an easy task. If you are the parent seeking the change, you will have to provide the court with substantial proof to support your request. A child custody order is attested by the court, and therefore, isn't easy to change. In some circumstances, the court will consider a petition to modify the custody order.

  • Can I Challenge Final Decision Making Authority?
      by HG.org

    In Georgia, a judge can designate or parents can decide on which parent will have final decision making authority. This authority extends to certain important aspects of the child’s life.

  • Where Goes the House in a Divorce?
      by HG.org

    The home that the family lived in during the marriage is often the most valuable asset that a couple owns. Therefore, this asset may receive much attention during the divorce proceedings. What happens to a house after divorce depends on state laws, circumstances involving the house and the parties’ actions.

  • How Is Spousal Support Determined?
      by HG.org

    Like many issues involving family law, state law largely dictates spousal support matters. This includes whether or not to award spousal support and in what amount.


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