Computer Crime Lawyers in the USA


Computer Crime Lawyers in the USA ► Other Countries



All Articles »Computer Crime Lawyers USA - Recent Legal Articles

  • Sexual Exploitation of a Minor/Child Pornography - A.R.S. §13-3553

    In the Phoenix area or anywhere else in the State of Arizona, as per A.R.S. §13-3553, sexual exploitation of a minor, also commonly referred to as child pornography, is a very serious offense that is classified a class 2 felony.

  • Internet Enables Thieves to Steal $4 Billion in Tax Refunds

    Criminals are utilizing their Internet connection to file false tax returns that help them steal refunds from the innocent. In 2013, fraudulent returns saw almost $4 billion sent into the hands of scam artists. Making things worse is the fact that the Internal Revenue Service is having a hard time stopping the fraud from happening in the first place.

  • Top Five White Collar Criminals of All Time

    Quick, who’s the top white collar criminal of all time? If you said, “Bernie Madoff” you’d be wrong, at least as far as sentences go. You wouldn’t be too far off—Mr. Madoff’s 150-year-sentence is impressive, but he only ranks fifth in the list of sentences imposed on high-dollar scammers. Here’s the list of the five most notorious “businessmen” of all time, beginning with that fifth-place notable crook:

  • What Does the Law Say About Using Someone's Webcam or Computer Microphone to Spy on Them?
      by HG.org

    In our modern, connected age, it seems everyone has a tablet or laptop computer that they use on a daily basis. These computers usually have built in webcams and microphones which, while very useful for legitimate purposes like video calls, can also be a vehicle for embarrassment, identity theft, and spying on your most intimate moments. So, what does the law have to say about using someone's webcam or computer microphone to spy on them?

  • Injured by Online Dating, Can I Sue?
      by HG.org

    Just as with real world dating, sometimes Internet dating can be dangerous. People may not be who they say or may actually be dangerous. Online dating services may use your personal information and photographs for purposes other than what you had intended. Internet dating sites may actually put tracking software on your computer or expose you to identity theft, computer viruses, or other harm. So, if you have been injured by a dating site in some way, it is common to wonder whether you can sue?

  • Is it Legal for Someone to Post my Private Photos Then Demand Money for Their Removal?
      by HG.org

    Over the last few years, a number of unscrupulous websites have developed around Americans' increasing comfort with sharing private, intimate photos with one another. While the photos are usually not intended for public consumption, often after a rough breakup or other event in which the recipient is left unhappy, that person will post those photos for the world to see. But is this legal? More importantly, can the site where the photos are posted legally charge you to take them down?

  • Do Real World Laws Apply to Virtual World Problems?
      by HG.org

    Everyday, millions of people login from all over the world to experience various virtual worlds. Some are part of a video game, others are intended to allow for social interactions, and still others include elements for commercial dealings. Whatever the purpose, any environment in which people interact can lead to friction and disagreements of various sorts. This has led many to ask whether the laws of the real world can or should apply to virtual world problems.

  • Can You Fire Someone For Their Social Media Complaints About Work?
      by HG.org

    Social media is everywhere today; from Facebook to Twitter to LinkedIn, it would be almost impossible for an employer not to have someone working for them that has some form of social media presence. While you might be able to keep an employee from updating their Facebook status from the office, can you do anything about what they say or do about you or your company on their social media in their own time? Indeed, can you fire someone for their social media complaints about work?

  • Is There a Law Against Cyberstalking or Cyberharassment?
      by HG.org

    With the rise of social networking, many have lost some of their concerns about personal privacy. Indeed, millions of Americans share the intimate details of their lives with an audience of dozens to thousands to sometimes even millions of people everyday, and think nothing of it. But what happens when someone begins to use this information against you? Are they violating any laws by following you online or bothering you on the Internet?

  • Ninth Circuit Outlines Boundaries of Computer Fraud and Abuse Act

    In United States v. Nosal, the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals was asked to determine the boundaries of the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act (CFAA), 18 U.S.C. § 1030. It ultimately concluded that violations of an employer's computer use policy did not amount to "exceeding authorized access" under the CFAA.


Find a Local Lawyer