Computer Crime Lawyers in the USA


Computer Crime Lawyers in the USA ► Other Countries



All Articles »Computer Crime Lawyers USA - Recent Legal Articles

  • Committing Offenses on the Internet – Internet Crime

    When a crime is allegedly committed using the internet the first question is always, “Where should this case be handled?” Should it be in the state where the offender committed the offense? Should it be where the victim lives? Should it be somewhere else like in federal court?

  • Someone Hacked My Phone or Computer, What Can I Do?
      by HG.org

    There are few things that feel more violating than finding that someone has hacked into your phone or computer. When this happens, the first reaction may be to call the authorities and report the breach. But, many are surprised to find that police are not always terribly interested to hear about the event. So, what can you do if someone hacks your computer or phone?

  • Virginia Credit Card Theft Forgery Fraud Penalties Laws

    The following are the different laws regarding credit card crimes in Virginia.

  • MD vs. VA Child Pornography Solicitation Of Minor Laws & Federal Court

    Two of the most commonly prosecuted computer sex crimes laws in the US are child pornography sex crimes and solicitation of minor sex crimes. These two charges have different statutes that make this kind of activity criminal in VA, MD & in the Federal Courts.

  • Downloading Adult Porn in Bulk Can Get You in Trouble with Child Porn

    Searching for, viewing and downloading adult pornography is not illegal. But, there is a problem when sexually explicit images of children sneak into group of otherwise legal images during a bulk download. No matter how you receive it, even if accidentally, possession of child pornography is illegal.

  • Internet Enables Thieves to Steal $4 Billion in Tax Refunds

    Criminals are utilizing their Internet connection to file false tax returns that help them steal refunds from the innocent. In 2013, fraudulent returns saw almost $4 billion sent into the hands of scam artists. Making things worse is the fact that the Internal Revenue Service is having a hard time stopping the fraud from happening in the first place.

  • Top Five White Collar Criminals of All Time

    Quick, who’s the top white collar criminal of all time? If you said, “Bernie Madoff” you’d be wrong, at least as far as sentences go. You wouldn’t be too far off—Mr. Madoff’s 150-year-sentence is impressive, but he only ranks fifth in the list of sentences imposed on high-dollar scammers. Here’s the list of the five most notorious “businessmen” of all time, beginning with that fifth-place notable crook:

  • What Does the Law Say About Using Someone's Webcam or Computer Microphone to Spy on Them?
      by HG.org

    In our modern, connected age, it seems everyone has a tablet or laptop computer that they use on a daily basis. These computers usually have built in webcams and microphones which, while very useful for legitimate purposes like video calls, can also be a vehicle for embarrassment, identity theft, and spying on your most intimate moments. So, what does the law have to say about using someone's webcam or computer microphone to spy on them?

  • Injured by Online Dating, Can I Sue?
      by HG.org

    Just as with real world dating, sometimes Internet dating can be dangerous. People may not be who they say or may actually be dangerous. Online dating services may use your personal information and photographs for purposes other than what you had intended. Internet dating sites may actually put tracking software on your computer or expose you to identity theft, computer viruses, or other harm. So, if you have been injured by a dating site in some way, it is common to wonder whether you can sue?

  • Is it Legal for Someone to Post my Private Photos Then Demand Money for Their Removal?
      by HG.org

    Over the last few years, a number of unscrupulous websites have developed around Americans' increasing comfort with sharing private, intimate photos with one another. While the photos are usually not intended for public consumption, often after a rough breakup or other event in which the recipient is left unhappy, that person will post those photos for the world to see. But is this legal? More importantly, can the site where the photos are posted legally charge you to take them down?


Find a Local Lawyer