Criminal Defense Law

Criminal defense law consists of the legal protections afforded to people who have been accused of committing a crime. Law enforcement agencies and government prosecutors have extensive resources at their disposal. Without adequate protections for the accused, the balance of power within the justice system would become skewed in favor of the government. As it is, fair treatment for criminal defendants often depends as much upon the skill of their defense attorney as it does the substantive protections contained in the law.

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Criminal Defense Lawyers in the USA


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All Articles »Criminal Defense Lawyers USA - Recent Legal Articles

  • Denied an Interview Because of Past Mistakes? The Law Can Protect Your Rights

    Earlier this year, HB5701, the Job Opportunities for Qualified Applicants Act, was passed and signed into law in Illinois. This law is more colloquially known as the Ban the Box law and presents Illinois job applicants with greater opportunities to secure employment. Similar laws are becoming popular throughout the United States. Currently, 12 states have statewide Ban the Box laws and 19 states contain at least one city or county with this type of law.

  • How Will A DWI Affect My Job?

    The implications that a DWI charge can have on your employment.

  • Can I Represent Myself in a Criminal Case?

    Explaining the process of representing oneself in a criminal case, and outlining the risks involved with doing so.

  • Suspension and Deferral of Deportations: A Band-Aid Covering the Tumor

    Congress and President Obama have both taken recent steps in passing two measures that move in the right direction to solve the immigration crisis in the United States.

  • Five Ways Not to Become a Blind Mule

    Yes, it does happen. While the majority of those who are arrested at the international border with cars laden with narcotics know that of their illicit cargo, there are the occasional blind mules –those who were duped by strangers, business associates or even loved ones to carry the contraband.

  • Reasonable Suspicion in DWI Cases

    Law enforcement officers are adamant about cracking down on drunk drivers. But what is considered reasonable suspicion when making those stops? Reasonable suspicion can be complicated in DWI cases, but officers must believe some form of criminal activity has taken place before a stop can be made.

  • Evidence Needed for a Family Violence Protective Order

    Seeking a protective order after an instance of family violence can be complex. A protective order can be used to help a victim of family violence feel safer by restricting his or her interactions with the alleged abuser. However, there are several elements that must be proven to ensure a court would approve a protective order.

  • Is Texting While Driving Worse Than DUI?

    In today’s world Driving Under the Influence or Driving While Impaired is the poster child of the campaign against bad actors behind the wheel, and with good reason.

  • Do DUI Checkpoints Violate the Fourth Amendment?

    For many people who are stopped and arrested for driving under the influence after going through a DUI checkpoint, a very common question is whether or not these checkpoints comply with the Fourth Amendment to the United States Constitution, which prohibits unreasonable searches and seizures. The U.S. Supreme Court has previously held that an officer must have probable cause that the driver is engaged in some sort of illegal activity before he or she can legally pull that vehicle over.

  • Should I Just Plead Guilty and Avoid a Trial?
      by HG.org

    When a criminal defendant is confronting a criminal case and is slated to go to trial, it is the criminal defendant’s decision whether to proceed to trial or to plead guilty in order to avoid it. While his or her lawyer can provide information about the pros and cons of going to trial, the lawyer cannot generally make this decision for the client. However, before a criminal defendant decides to plead guilty, he or she should be aware of the consequences of this action and any alternatives.


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