Criminal Law

Criminal law involves a system of legal rules designed to keep the public safe and deter wrongful conduct. Those who violate the law face incarceration, fines, and other penalties. The American criminal justice system is both complex, and adversarial in nature. With the exception of minor traffic violations, accused individuals will require the assistance of an attorney.

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All Articles »Criminal Law Lawyers USA - Recent Legal Articles

  • Stop And Frisk Laws

    According to the United States Constitution, every American citizen has the right to be protected against unreasonable searches and seizures.

  • How Are People Charged as an Accomplice?
      by HG.org

    Accomplice liability arises when a person helps another commit a crime with the intent of providing such assistance.

  • Fleeing and Eluding Offenses in Florida

    In the State of Florida, fleeing and eluding a police officer is a felony offense that carries some harsh penalties, including a mandatory adjudication of guilt and a mandatory driver's license suspension, which can range from one to five years. This article outlines the proscribed conduct, the varying degrees of this particular offense, and its associated penalties.

  • Website Ripoffs: How to Get a Refund from an Uncooperative Website Owner
      by HG.org

    Most of us have fallen for it at one time or another. A website offers a “free” or reduced fee trial for its services, but asks for a credit card upfront. It tells you that your membership will automatically renew if you do not cancel before the end of your free trial. You use the service, but do not want to pay for it, so you try to cancel and get charged anyway.

  • What Is Proof Beyond a Reasonable Doubt?
      by HG.org

    Proof beyond a reasonable doubt is the legal standard that the prosecution must meet in order to successfully find a criminal defendant guilty of a crime. This standard applies to each element of the crime.

  • Arson - Why Your Criminal Defense Attorney Matters

    Arson cases can either be charged in federal or state court. In Minnesota, the most common arson charge is arson in the first degree, which charges that the person intentionally set fire to his home or other dwelling, usually for the insurance money or some other financial reason. This is a serious charge that, if convicted, will likely result in at least a 4-year prison sentence. If you or a family member is facing charges of arson, you need an attorney experienced in handling arson cases.

  • Escalating and Deescalating Murder Charges

    On June 5, 2011, there was a case of a transgendered female who was out for a night on the town when she and some of friends were harassed by a group of young men. It started out with harsh words and eventually descended into violence. When she walked away, she was assaulted by one of the men, and she took a pair of scissors from her purse. She stabbed the assaulter, leading to his death.

  • Is There a Such Thing as Marital Rape?
      by HG.org

    Marital rape is nonconsensual sex between two spouses. Marital rape is believed to occur in significant numbers but is underreported. However, this sexual crime may be treated differently than other sexual crimes, depending on the law of the jurisdiction where the charge is filed.

  • When Can the Police Stop me on the Street? What are my Rights?

    Police will often use a person’s presence in a high-crime area, coupled with unprovoked flight as sufficient to justify an officer’s brief, investigative stop. Illinois courts have decided that this was consistent with previous decisions recognizing a citizen’s right to ignore the police, as it found that unprovoked flight is not simply refusing to cooperate but is suspicious conduct that allows the police to investigate.

  • Committing Offenses on the Internet – Internet Crime

    When a crime is allegedly committed using the internet the first question is always, “Where should this case be handled?” Should it be in the state where the offender committed the offense? Should it be where the victim lives? Should it be somewhere else like in federal court?


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