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  • Can You Get Fired for What You Post on Social Media?
      by HG.org

    Like the answer to so many legal questions, it depends. As more and more people are using social media, this area has become a common ground for employees to post information about their jobs, their personal lives, their views and other aspects of their lives that do not pertain to their work. However, in some cases, employers may have grounds to fire employees for their social media conduct.

  • Prohibited Practices in Employment Law
      by HG.org

    Despite numerous labor and employment laws on the federal, state and local levels, workplace discrimination continues to be a problem in the United States. When employers do not follow applicable laws that prohibit workplace discrimination, they expose themselves to potential civil liability.

  • Age Discrimination in California
      by HG.org

    Many older workers find it difficult to find employment after being discharged from their previous employment or reentering the workforce after time out of it. Some employers may inadvertently favor younger employees. Rejecting older applicants in favor of younger ones may expose employers to liability under state and federal laws.

  • Prohibited Discrimination under the ADEA
      by HG.org

    The Age Discrimination in Employment Act of 1967 prohibits employment discrimination against individuals who are age 40 or older. It makes it unlawful to use a person’s age if he or she is at least 40 years old as a consideration in employment decisions in most cases.

  • Workplace Discrimination on the Basis of Religion in California
      by HG.org

    In 2011, the United States saw an uptake in the number of cases filed with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission that alleged workplace discrimination on the basis of religious discrimination. In that year, 4,151 cases were filed, the highest number of filings that existed for the last 20 years.

  • What Types of Compensation Can I Receive in a Workers’ Compensation Case?
      by HG.org

    Workers’ compensation provides monetary and other benefits to workers who sustain work-related injuries or who develop illnesses because of their work. The availability f benefits depends on the nature of the illness or injury and state laws that govern workers’ compensation benefits.

  • Which Employers Have to Have Workers’ Comp?
      by HG.org

    Workers’ compensation is an insurance product that provides monetary compensation and paid medical benefits to workers who are injured within the scope of their work. Workers’ compensation laws are primarily based on state law. State law governs how the workers’ compensation process works and which employers are required to have insurance.

  • Thousands of FLSA Lawsuits Filed by Workers for Unpaid Overtime and Other Labor Laws Violations

    The Fair Labor Standards Act was passed by Congress to protect the rights of workers and ensure that they receive fair compensation from their employers. When companies fail to properly compensate their employees for their overtime work, they can be held accountable in court. In recent years, numerous FLSA unpaid overtime lawsuits have been filed by workers. A total of 7,964 FLSA lawsuits were filed in 2014, a 3.32% increase from the 7,708 cases that were filed during the previous year.

  • Does Workers’ Compensation Pay for a Remote Employee’s Injury
      by HG.org

    With the advance in technology, many individuals are able to work for employers completely or partially on a remote basis. They can often stay just as engaged in the workplace with phones, computers and other technological aids. This working relationship complicates questions of liability, such as determining whether workers’ compensation will pay for the injuries sustained by an employee.

  • Are Salaried Employees in California Entitled to Overtime Pay?

    The short answer to this question is “sometimes” regarding California state law on the subject of exempt versus non-exempt status of employees. However, before making decisions concerning the status of an employee, and whether to pay an employee a salary, or instead by the hour, an employer should consult with an employment law attorney who handles wage and hour issues.


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