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Employees Rights Lawyers USA - Recent Legal Articles

  • What Temp Workers Need to Know about Workplace Injuries

    If you are one of the millions of temp workers in this country, you may be unsure of your employment rights, including protections against discrimination, eligibility for workers’ compensation benefits, and wage and hour rights. Temporary workers can rest assured: while you may not have the same job security that full-time employees have, you do have a number of employment rights and protections.

  • Why American Women Should Be Interested in the FAMILY Act
      by HG.org

    In 2004, a Harvard University study found that of 168 countries surveyed, 163 had some form of government mandated maternity leave pay. The United States was not one of them. As a result, millions of American women suffer crippling economic hardships when they must take time off to give birth, and then are forced to return to work prematurely or go without income. Enter the FAMILY Act.

  • Are Employers Required to Allow Union Signs on Company Property?
      by HG.org

    In states where unions are strong, it is not uncommon to see posters and other materials related to the union located in company break rooms or other parts of the employer's property. Even in “right to work” states, where unions are less prominent, one can occasionally find such materials. But some employers resist, and would prefer not to have such materials on their property. So, is an employer required to allow union signs on company property?

  • Can You Fire Someone For Their Social Media Complaints About Work?
      by HG.org

    Social media is everywhere today; from Facebook to Twitter to LinkedIn, it would be almost impossible for an employer not to have someone working for them that has some form of social media presence. While you might be able to keep an employee from updating their Facebook status from the office, can you do anything about what they say or do about you or your company on their social media in their own time? Indeed, can you fire someone for their social media complaints about work?

  • Occupational Disease and Missouri Workers’ Comp: Who’s Entitled?

    An occupational disease is one that has been contracted as a direct result of a persons employment.

  • Long Term Disability ("LTD") Appeals and Lawsuits -- Frequently Asked Questions

    If your claim for Long Term Disability ("LTD") benefits has been denied or terminated, this article may answer some of your questions and concerns.

  • What Benefits are Employees Entitled to After Termination?
      by HG.org

    Leaving a job, whether intentionally, by being fired, or through circumstances beyond your control (such as layoffs), is almost always tinged with at least a little (and often a lot) of stress. One of the biggest concerns faced by many in this position is what sorts of benefits they are entitled to? Will their insurance continue? Are they guaranteed a severance? What happens if they cannot immediately find a job?

  • Can Store Uniforms Constitute Religious Discrimination?
      by HG.org

    A former Abercrombie & Fitch employee has won a major discrimination case against the popular clothing company. Umme-Hani Khan, a 19 year old Muslim woman obtained the assistance of the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission.

  • Habitually Absent, Tardy, or Sick? How to Deal with Employees Who Are Not Coming to Work
      by HG.org

    Do you have a trouble employee that can never seem to make it to work when they are supposed to? Either they are always late or they are not there at all? How should you go about disciplining this employee, particularly if you have let it slide in the past? Is there any risk to firing someone for claiming too much sick time (even if they are entitled to those days under the terms of their employment)?

  • What to do if You Have Been Fired for Whistleblowing
      by HG.org

    A "whistleblower" is someone who reports a violation of the law by his or her employer. The violation may be against the reporting employee, as with sexual harassment claims, or may be a general violation like illegally polluting, securities violations, etc. While the law is supposed to protect people for doing the right thing, often whistleblowers are fired after reporting the inappropriate situation. So what should you do if you have been fired after blowing the whistle?