Employment Law

Employment law governs the rights and duties between employers and workers. Also referred to as labor law, these rules are primarily designed to keep workers safe and make sure they are treated fairly, although laws are in place to protect employers’ interests as well. Employment laws are based on federal and state constitutions, legislation, administrative rules, and court opinions. A particular employment relationship may also be governed by contract.

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  • What Are the Recoverable Damages for California Employees Who were Wrongfully Terminated?

    In California, the general rule is that employment is “at will” and therefore employers may terminate employees at any time and even for no reason. However, many employers fail to realize that an employee cannot be terminated for illegal reasons pursuant to applicable federal and state employment laws. In particular, California employers are prohibited from discharging employees because of their inclusion in a protected class.

  • The Status of Independent Contractor vs. Employment Relationship

    The issue of whether a worker is an independent contractor or an employee is currently on the minds of many business owners. In fact, the California legislature has recently established a strong disincentive for wrongly classifying individual workers as independent contractors.

  • Know the Laws that Prohibit Employment Discrimination on the Basis of Sex

    Sex discrimination is one of the most prevalent issues in the realm of employment. It involves preferential treatment favoring the male or female sex. The most common example of such discrimination is an employer’s preference of male employees over their female counterparts in various aspects of employment.

  • Truck Drivers and Work Related Injuries in New York State

    There are a variety of injuries and illnesses suffered by workers in New York State. In addition, although it is fairly common to see neck and back injuries in strenuous occupations, even the most sedentary jobs can result in the development of serious orthopedic problems. It is clear, however, that certain jobs present with an increased risk of injury.

  • FEHA Regulations Covered Employers Must Comply Within California

    The state of California is one of the most liberal states in the country with respect to protecting employee rights in the workplace. In this regard, the failure to comply with state laws puts employers at risk of being sued in civil court and/or being the subject of investigations based upon employee administrative complaints submitted to state and/or local government agencies.

  • Disability Discrimination in California: FAQs Finally Answered

    Pursuant to the Fair Employment and Housing Act (FEHA), California employees with disabilities are protected from workplace discrimination, harassment, and retaliation. However, while the FEHA protects disabled employees all over the state of California, not all employees are aware of its coverage.

  • Nailing Down Independent Contractor Status

    Although percentage-based pay may create desirable incentives from an employer’s standpoint (and eliminate the need to pay employees for down time), this strategy can result in significant potential liability, including possible exposure to class action lawsuits. This may even be turning into a nationwide trend (with salon workers pursuing similar wage and hour claims in New Jersey and New York).

  • Employer Actions That Violate California’s Overtime Law

    California’s overtime law provides that every non-exempt worker is entitled to receive one and one-half times the regular rate of pay for every hour they work over 8 hours per day and/or 40-hours per workweek. If employers perform work over 12 hours during a single workday, they are entitled to twice the regular rate of pay.

  • Top Work Injuries and Illnesses in Healthcare Industry

    Healthcare is the fastest-growing sector of the U.S. economy, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), employing over 18 million workers – the majority of which (80%) are women. Healthcare workers – including doctors, nurses, lab technicians, pharmacists, and a number of other professionals – are exposed to a wide range of occupational hazards.

  • Common Risks for Workplace Injuries in Construction Industry

    Construction workers are especially vulnerable to work-related injuries. According to OSHA, nearly 6.5 million people work at approximately 252,000 construction sites across the nation on any given day, and the fatal injury rate for the construction industry is higher than the national average for all industries.


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