Employment Law

Employment law governs the rights and duties between employers and workers. Also referred to as labor law, these rules are primarily designed to keep workers safe and make sure they are treated fairly, although laws are in place to protect employers’ interests as well. Employment laws are based on federal and state constitutions, legislation, administrative rules, and court opinions. A particular employment relationship may also be governed by contract.

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All Articles »Employment Lawyers USA - Recent Legal Articles

  • Wrongful Termination Case

    A tax lawyer who worked at the Vanguard Group in Malvern, New York, was terminated from his position after consistently warning his employer that they were considerably underpaying on its taxes. The unlawful practices resulted in Vanguard cheating the US Government out of more than a billion dollars throughout the last several years. Some of the money saved from the illegal tax practices was used to enhance bosses’ salaries.

  • Back Injuries in Healthcare Workers

    Back injuries including herniated discs, strained muscles, pulled or torn ligaments and disc degeneration are the most common work injuries among healthcare workers. Nurses, nursing aids, orderlies, attendants, laundry workers, kitchen workers and environmental services in the healthcare field can suffer from back injuries caused by everyday tasks or workplace accidents.

  • Workers' Compensation Subrogation

    Why does the workers' compensation insurance company get money back from my negligence lawsuit?

  • New Laws to Help Sexual Abuse Victims and Their Lawyers in California

    As a result of changes to sexual abuse laws in California and a more liberal statute of limitations, attorneys in California now have a greater chance to pursue perpetrators of sexual abuse and obtain justice for their victims. Thanks in part to greater public awareness of the problem, recent reports in the news, and more women willing to come forward after being abused, a greater number of abuse and molestation victims can at last obtain some measure of justice for the trauma they’ve endured.

  • How Can a Felony Conviction Affect My Career?
      by HG.org

    If you are facing a felony conviction, the lasting effects on your career can endure for much longer than any time that you receive. Being convicted of a felony can have some of the following severe ramifications on your career.

  • Tort Liability Protection Offered to Ohio Businesses Who Hire Ex-Criminals

    In the latter part of 2012, the Ohio legislature passed Senate Bill 337, providing tort liability protection for businesses choosing to hire rehabilitated ex-criminals. According to Senate Bill 337 (now codified as Ohio Revised Code Section 2953.25), if an Ohio business hires a job applicant who possesses a Certification of Qualification for Employment (CQE), then the business is entitled to immunity from negligent hiring claims.

  • Denied an Interview Because of Past Mistakes? The Law Can Protect Your Rights

    Earlier this year, HB5701, the Job Opportunities for Qualified Applicants Act, was passed and signed into law in Illinois. This law is more colloquially known as the Ban the Box law and presents Illinois job applicants with greater opportunities to secure employment. Similar laws are becoming popular throughout the United States. Currently, 12 states have statewide Ban the Box laws and 19 states contain at least one city or county with this type of law.

  • Can I Get the Other Side to Pay My Attorneys’ Fees If I Win My Case?
      by HG.org

    While other countries may require the losing side to pay both sets of attorneys’ fees, in the United States, this is not usually the rule. Requiring the losing side to pay all attorneys’ fees and costs may serve as a deterrent for individuals to access the court system for justice and works against public policy.

  • Can an Employer Refuse to Hire Me for Having a Felony?
      by HG.org

    Individuals who have been convicted of a felony often experience difficulty in securing employment because many employers choose not to hire them. Just as employers may have policies in place that may result in termination upon the conviction of a felony, they may also have policies that weigh against hiring convicted felons. However, a series of laws may prevent an employer from having a blanket policy against discriminating against employees who have been convicted of a felony.

  • Collecting A Judgment From an Employer in California

    A large part of our judgment collection law practice is collection of labor awards, or more specifically enforcement labor judgments. Essentially, these result when an employer fails to properly pay an employee for wages, overtime pay, or otherwise violates California labor laws.


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