Entertainment Law Lawyers in the USA


Entertainment Law Lawyers in the USA ► Other Countries


Find a Law Firm:

Entertainment Law Lawyers USA - Recent Legal Articles

  • Vesting of Contingent Compensation in Pay or Played Television Director Agreement

    One of the issues in negotiating director agreements in television is whether contingent compensation provision applies in situations where a director is pay or played off a film. The question becomes will the director be entitled to any portion of the negotiated contingent compensation since she has been terminated and is no longer with the project.

  • Did You Know There Are Laws Against Dancing?
      by HG.org

    Prom, homecoming, and other formal dances are rites of passage for millions of American youth. So, it is perhaps surprising to many that such an activity may be regulated by the law, but in many jurisdictions it is. And, we are not talking about exotic or belly or other suggestive types of dancing. These laws apply to any kind of dancing, including the stuff your grandparents were doing. So, what are some of the more unusual laws against dancing?

  • Video Games and the Law
      by HG.org

    Like virtually every other activity Americans engage in on a daily basis, even video games are subject to the restrictions and protections of the law. This is also an area of increasing interest as hundreds of new companies come into the video game market every year by developing the wildly popular game apps played on mobile phones and tablet devices.

  • Fighting Misappropriation of Name or Likeness
      by HG.org

    Americans have a non-explicit right (often called a “penumbra right”) to privacy. We find its origins in things like the right against self-incrimination, the right against illegal search and seizure, etc. In the modern era, the general nature of a right of privacy is the right of a person to be free from unwarranted publicity or the unwarranted appropriation or exploitation of that person's image, voice, or likeness.

  • Special Purpose Entity

    How can you protect your assets against creditors as a film maker?

  • Media Law: Know Your Rights

    It is the job of the entertainment industry to provide the general public with a source of entertainment. Unfortunately, the methods employed to do so are not always received well, and sometimes entertainers and media moguls can be sued for the risks they take when providing entertainment to viewers and listeners throughout the U.S.

  • SOPA Analysis: Why One Bill Threatened the Entire Internet

    The reason that SOPA garnered so much attention was largely due to vague language that seemed to provide the government with a very wide scope of power to shut down websites and block access. While the possibility of restrictions may have looked like censorship to a public used to a laissez-faire approach to internet access, the main targets of SOPA were primarily foreign websites that hosted libraries of pirated content.

  • Financing Independent Film: Tax Credits for Independent Film

    Independent film financing and tax credits are linked and play a huge role in making a successful film. Understanding where these credits are and how to obtain them is vital. Dunlap, Grubb & Weaver, experienced entertainment lawyers can help with this. This article lists the credits available in the United States by jurisdiction.

  • Going Mobile: A Quick Guide to Legal Issues When Monetizing (Non-Music) Content

    You are a publisher of traditional hard copy content (newspapers, books, graphic novels, magazines, photographs) and your materials are in demand to fill the digital pipeline created by numerous web-based and mobile applications. Or, you are a media agency or corporate brand manager seeking to extend your footprint into the online space. You are eager to have millions of new eyeballs accessing your treasure trove. Your software developers are on board, ready to digitize.

  • When Is a Copyright Registered?

    At what point in time is a copyright application considered to be “registered” so that the owner of the copyright can sue for damages under the U.S. Copyright Act of 1976? Is it when the copyright holder’s application is received by the Copyright Office (the “application approach”)? Or is it when the Copyright Office issues a certificate of registration (the “registration approach”)?


Find a Local Lawyer