Social Service Law




What Are Social Services?

Social Services are the public services provided by federal, state, and local governments. These services generally include things like healthcare, public housing programs, and welfare / social security.

The United States has provided various types of social services almost from its inception. Early social services usually involved pensions for sailors and soldiers. Later programs sought to provide for orphaned children, homeless, disabled, and other disadvantaged groups. Most programs were disconnected, however, and left large gaps in the coverage many required.

This changed in the early part of the 20th Century when a number of successive administrations began introducing more and more social programs. This ultimately culminated in the social programs that developed in the wake of the Great Depression and World War II. These included social security and welfare, numerous retirement and pensioning programs, insurance programs like medicare and medicaid, food stamps programs, public housing assistance, work placement programs, and many more.

For more information about social services please review the materials below. Additionally, you can find an attorney in your area to help you with your social services questions by visiting the Law Firms page of our site.

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Articles on HG.org Related to Social Services Law

  • How Can I Find a Medical Malpractice Lawyer?
    Malpractice occurs when some form of negligence, such as a misdiagnosis, treatment after the surgery, mismanagement of care, treatment errors or the continuing care plan of the patient when they have been released from the hospital.
  • Changing Illinois Medicaid Laws Affect Personal Injury Settlements
    Changes are coming to personal injury settlements in 2016. These laws will affect those with Medicare and Medicaid. Here is how you can stay ahead of these changes, and be aware of their effect.
  • New Bill Aims to Protect Nurses from Injury
    Nurses and medical institutions will both benefit from the new laws being passed, which will help ensure safety regulations and accountability within the workplace.
  • Common & Deadly Forms of Medical Malpractice
    Medical errors are the third most common cause of death for Americans. Each year, nearly 400,000 people die as a result of errors made by trained medical professionals. With heart disease and cancer taking the first and second spots on this grim list, it’s a statistic that may be underreported.
  • Losing Disability Benefits
    The Social Security Disability and Supplemental Security Income programs both provide monetary benefits to disabled individuals although they are based on different economic eligibility criteria. Social Security Disability is available to workers who have earned enough work credits over their lifetime and within the last ten years.
  • Claims that Give Rise to Medical Malpractice
    Technology has progressed to allow all manner of surgeries that extensively prolong human life to be performed with varying types of machinery. Despite this, there are in excess of 225,000 cases of patients who die while receiving medical treatment due to malpractice.
  • Disability Hearing Preparation
    Applicants for SSI disability or SSDI disability benefits go through a sequential evaluation process. Clearer and more serious impediments are handled more quickly, including a special route for terminal claims. There are also multiple appeals that claimants are provided throughout the process.
  • Establishing Standards for Medical Treatment
    In a medical malpractice case, the plaintiff bears the burden of establishing that the medical professional provided treatment in a negligent manner. This is often expressed as the medical professional deviating from the accepted standard of care. These lawsuits have transformed how one is treated medically.
  • What Makes a Medical Malpractice Case?
    Medical malpractice occurs when a healthcare professional deviated from the appropriate standard of care and, as a result, injured the patient in the process. In order to support a medical malpractice case, it is usually necessary to have medical experts piece the information together into a cohesive story.
  • Benicar Side Effects Mistaken For Celiac Disease
    A recent study has found that doctors have been misdiagnosing intestinal side effects of Benicar as Celiac disease.
  • All Health Care and Social Law Articles

    Articles written by attorneys and experts worldwide discussing legal aspects related to Health Care and Social including: defective drugs, failure to diagnose, informed consent, medical law, medical malpractice, medication errors, pharmaceutical law, social security, social services law, surgical errors.

Department of Health and Social Services by State

Social Services Law - US

  • ABA - Commission on Homelessness and Poverty

    In 1991, the Commission on Homelessness and Poverty was established by the Board of Governors of the American Bar Association (ABA). The Commission is charged with the following tasks: (1) Educating members of the bar and the public about legal and other problems of poor and homeless people and ways in which lawyers can assist in solving or ameliorating them; (2) training lawyers in areas needed to provide pro bono legal assistance to homeless people and those at risk of becoming homeless; (3) working with all ABA entities on issues arising in their jurisdiction that affect poor and homeless people; and (4) engaging in such further activities as may be necessary and proper for the fulfillment of these responsibilities, including working with state and federal executive branches and legislative bodies concerning matters relating to the poor and homeless.

  • Affordable Care Act

    The Affordable Care Act passed by Congress and signed by President Obama this year will provide seniors and their families with greater savings and increased quality health care. It will also ensure accountability throughout the health care system so patients and their doctor—not insurance companies—have greater control over their own care.

  • Department of Health and Human Services (HHS)

    The Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) is the United States government's principal agency for protecting the health of all Americans and providing essential human services, especially for those who are least able to help themselves.

  • Office for Human Research Protections (OHRP) - Regulations

    OHRP's Division of Compliance Oversight (DCO) reviews institutional compliance with the federal regulations governing the protection of human subjects in HHS-sponsored research 45 CFR 46. DCO evaluates all written substantive allegations or indications of noncompliance with the HHS regulations. If complaints or concerns arise regarding an institution's human subject protection practices, OHRP opens a formal evaluation and, if necessary, requires corrective action by the institution.

  • Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act of 1996

    On August 22, 1996, President Clinton signed into law the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act of 1996, Public Law 104-193, better known as the Welfare Reform Bill. This law changes how governmental financial assistance is administered including: changing federal funding to states from an open-ended entitlement to a series of capped block grant allocations; sets time limits on entitlements and cash assistance to welfare recipients; requires most welfare recipients to engage in job activities (this includes work experience, community service, job training, vocational education); changes the disability definitions for Supplemental Security Income (SSI) for children who apply; mandates states to establish methods to enforce collection of unpaid parental child support; denies many legal immigrants from collecting SSI and food stamps; consolidates all child care programs into the Child Care and Development Block Grant, and changes food stamp recertification requirements.

  • Welfare Law - Overview

    In the United States, welfare benefits for individuals and families with no or low income had been almost non-existent prior to the Great Depression of the 1930s. With millions of people unemployed, the federal government saw income security as a national problem. In addition to establishing two major "social insurance" programs to respond to future income loss (Social Security and Unemployment compensation), the Social Security Act of 1935 launched federal grants to support state welfare programs for low-income elderly and families with children.

Social Services Law - International

  • British Association of Social Workers (BASW)

    The British Association of Social Workers (BASW) is the largest association representing social work and social workers in the UK. Whether you are qualified or not, experienced, or just entering the profession, we are here to help, support, advise and campaign on your behalf.

  • Canadian Association of Social Workers

    On a national level, CASW has adopted a pro-active approach to issues pertinent to social policy/social work. It produces and distributes timely information for its members, and special projects are initiated and sponsored. CASW representatives serve on coalitions and participate on a host of affiliated, nationwide committees on a continuing basis. As well, they provide consultation with government, other professional and non-governmental groups and, of course, the general public.

  • Division for Social Policy and Development - United Nations

    The Division for Social Policy and Development provides substantive support to Governments in developing policy measures and initiatives to promote inclusive "societies for all", where each individual has rights and responsibilities regardless of economic status (poverty), social status (gender, marital), specific age group (older persons, youth), disability or cultural or religious affiliation. The aim is to ensure that individuals and communities are enabled to participate in society and contribute to national development while enjoying basic human rights and fundamental freedoms.

  • International Federation of Social Workers (IFSW)

    The International Federation of Social Workers (IFSW) is a global organisation striving for social justice, human rights and social development through the development of social work, best practices and international cooperation between social workers and their professional organisations.

  • International Social Service (ISS)

    The International Social Service (ISS) helps individuals, children and families confronted with social problems involving two, or more, countries as a consequence of international migration or displacement. As an international not-for-profit organisation, it is active in around 140 countries through a network of national branches, affiliated bureaus and correspondents (link toward illustrative map). Each year, it provides services to more than 50’000 persons throughout the world each year.

Organizations Related to Social Services Law

  • Administration for Children and Families (ACF)

    The Administration for Children and Families (ACF), within the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) is responsible for federal programs that promote the economic and social well-being of families, children, individuals, and communities. ACF programs aim to achieve the following: * families and individuals empowered to increase their own economic independence and productivity; * strong, healthy, supportive communities that have a positive impact on the quality of life and the development of children; * partnerships with individuals, front-line service providers, communities, American Indian tribes, Native communities, states, and Congress that enable solutions which transcend traditional agency boundaries; * services planned, reformed, and integrated to improve needed access; * and a strong commitment to working with people with developmental disabilities, refugees, and migrants to address their needs, strengths, and abilities.

  • International Social Services, USA (ISS-USA)

    The mission of ISS is to improve the lives of children, families and adults impacted by migration and international crisis through advances in service, knowledge and public policy.

  • National Association of Social Workers

    The National Association of Social Workers (NASW) is the largest membership organization of professional social workers in the world, with 150,000 members. NASW works to enhance the professional growth and development of its members, to create and maintain professional standards, and to advance sound social policies.

  • Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA)

    The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) has established a clear vision for its work -- a life in the community for everyone. To realize this vision, the Agency has sharply focused its mission on building resilience and facilitating recovery for people with or at risk for mental or substance use disorders. SAMHSA is gearing all of its resources -- programs, policies and grants -- toward that outcome.

  • UN - Basic Social Services for All (BSSA)

    The Wall Chart on Basic Social Services for All (BSSA) was produced under the auspices of the ACC Task Force on Basic Social Services for All (TFBSSA) as one of the follow-up activities of the recent United Nations global conferences and summits, particularly: the International Conference on Population and Development (ICPD) (Cairo, 1994), the World Summit for Social Development (WSSD) (Copenhagen, 1995), the Fourth World Conference on Women (FWCW) (Beijing, 1995) and the Second World Conference on Human Settlements (Habitat II) (Istanbul, 1996).

  • Volunteers of America

    At Volunteers of America, we are more than a nonprofit organization. We are a ministry of service that includes nearly 16,000 paid, professional employees dedicated to helping those in need rebuild their lives and reach their full potential. Through our thousands of human service programs, including housing and healthcare, Volunteers of America helps more than 2 million people in over 400 communities in 44 states. Since 1896, we have supported and empowered America's most vulnerable groups, including at-risk youth, the frail elderly, men and women returning from prison, homeless individuals and families, people with disabilities, and those recovering from addictions. Our work touches the mind, body, heart — and ultimately the spirit — of those we serve, integrating our deep compassion with highly effective programs and services.

Publications Related to Social Services Law

  • Social Work Blog

    Welcome to NASW's Social Work Blog. On this site, you'll find a variety of topics and information related to the social work profession... and most importantly, users will be able to add comments from time to time related to those different issues. Any and all feedback is welcome, whether you're social worker, social work student, social work supporter, or your life has just been affected by social work.

  • The New Social Worker Magazine

    The magazine's primary focus is on career development for social workers and social work students at all levels. Each issue includes: * student role model profiles * book reviews * news of the profession * resources for social workers * features on practice specialties * articles on ethics * features on field placement issues and much, much more!




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