Alimony and Spousal Support Law

Lawyers Guide

Alimony, or spousal support, is meant to provide payment for a specific length of time after a divorce. The payment is provided from one spouse to the other. In this guide, learn more about how to receive, extend, and modify alimony.

  • ContentCan I Extend Alimony?

    Alimony, also referred to as spousal support in many jurisdictions, helps provide monetary payments from one spouse to the other spouse after a divorce or separation. It is specified for a specified period of time, usually with the goal of this spouse becoming financially independent. However, sometimes the recipient spouse may not reach financial independence in the time specified and may wish to extend the duration of alimony payments.

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  • ContentCan I Get Alimony After My Divorce Is Final?

    Divorce is one example of how life sometimes does not work out as planned. Sometimes after a divorce is final, one spouse may find that their financial situation is not what they expected. Perhaps the divorce was entered into too hastily or while the spouse was under extreme stress, or perhaps circumstances have changed drastically for a spouse. In some instances, it may be necessary to re-open the question of alimony after the divorce has been finalized.

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  • ContentCan I Reduce the Amount of Alimony I Pay if My Spouse Took Out a 401(k) Loan She Can’t Repay?

    Retirement accounts and 401(k) rely on certain rules that may even extend to divorce processes and the inability to repay these amounts that may not include an ex-spouse or the alimony payments. The specifics that revolve around these circumstances may require the person to pay back the loan without increasing alimony from the other person.

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  • ContentCritical Things to Understand about Spousal Support

    One highly contentious aspect of a divorce is spousal support. Spousal support may be awarded in a divorce action which involves one spouse making monetary payments to the other spouse for a specified duration of time. A court may order spousal support, or the parties may make an agreement pertaining to how much, for how long and under what conditions spousal support will be paid, if at all.

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  • ContentGrounds for Modifications to Spousal Support

    There are usually only certain ways for a person to receive a successful outcome when requesting modifications for spousal support depending on the circumstances of all parties involved. It is important to know what are valid grounds and which are not considerations by the judge in the courtroom, so the person may seek the best possible decision.

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  • ContentHow Do I Know If I Can Receive Alimony?

    Alimony, or spousal support, helps to provide a financial supplement to a lower-earning spouse to cover some of his or her living expenses. It is not available in all cases and is treated differently than child support, which is to take care of the child’s expenses.

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  • ContentHow Is the Amount of Spousal Support Determined?

    Spousal support is not ordered in every case. Instead, one party must request it or the parties must agree to it. After determining that spousal support should be awarded, courts may be tasked with the difficulty of determining how much support to award.

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  • ContentHow to Reduce Spousal Support

    When a marriage reaches its end, it is fairly common that a family court will order spousal support payments to provide more equal incomes between the parties. The marital settlement agreement or the divorce decree may contain information on the amount of support and its duration. However, sometimes factors change that warrant a reduction in spousal support.

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  • ContentLegal Remedies when a Spouse Has Stopped Paying Spousal Support

    When a former spouse does not comply with a court order to pay spousal support, there may be a number of remedies available to the recipient spouse.

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  • ContentMarry & Divorce Same Spouse Multiple Times - How It Affects Alimony

    If a person remarries his or her spouse, this generally ends alimony payments until the two decide to divorce once again, and this may lead to a completely new divorce process with a different spousal support conclusion. The judge will often still consider numerous factors between the married couple to decide the result.

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  • ContentWhat Should I Do If My Husband Won't Pay Alimony?

    In some divorce cases, alimony is ordered in order to help the spouse who earned less during the marriage or who may otherwise leave the marriage at a disadvantage to receive funds from the higher-earning spouse. This can help balance the financial stability of both spouses and keep the lower-earning spouse from being destitute and reliant on public assistance.

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  • ContentHow Long Do I Have Military Tricare after a Divorce?

    When divorcing a spouse, an individual in the military needs to update the Defense Enrollment Eligibility Reporting System first and then ensure that all other documentation is up to date as well. Then, the person needs to contact Tricare to determine if any other processes need completing based on the year, state or new changes.

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  • ContentWho Is Legally Responsible for Bills When Spouses Are Not Living Together?

    When spouses are not living together, it can be difficult to determine which spouse is legally responsible to pay debts. The timing of when the debt was incurred, the nature of the debt and state law are important considerations in this assessment.

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  • ContentUnemployed Spouse - Is My Divorce Affected?

    Many marriages end because of financial complications and problems, and these circumstances often affect the divorce process as well whether for spousal support or monetary child benefits. If the judge determines that the unemployment is intentional or voluntary, he or she may use other factors to alter support or even custody matters.

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  • ContentAm I Liable for My Spouse's Credit Card Debt?

    While in many cases one spouse is not liable for the other’s credit card debt, this depends on a number of factors. Of these, the nature of the debt and where the debt was incurred are two primary considerations.

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