Changing Legal Job - Quitting Your Legal Employment Legal Employment Center

Leaving Your Legal Job

  • Alternative Careers for JD's

    Occasionally, lawyers find themselves at a crossroads in their careers. They reach the conclusion that the practice of law no longer interests them, which raises the question about what they can do with their law degrees besides practicing law.

  • Alternative Legal Careers

    How to search for career opportunities outside the legal field.

  • Creating a Satisfying Second Act in Your Legal Career

    Attorneys are widely perceived as successful in life and many would affirm their satisfaction with their careers. But lawyers who can claim they “couldn’t be happier” are rare, and far more common are those who don’t take time to consider how making changes might yield greater satisfaction.

  • Law Students Demand More from the Profession

    After the better part of a decade in post-law school employment, you might find yourself asking, "Is this all there is?"

  • Leaving a Law Job Without Leaving a Bad Taste

    Some things to consider when leaving your legal job.

  • Leaving your Legal Career Far Behind

    These women went into the law for all of the right reasons -- and some wrong ones -- but then listened to that inner voice.

  • Quitting Your Job -

    People quit their jobs for a variety of reasons. These reasons include a lack of advancement opportunities, they want more money, or simply because they are unhappy. Find out how to decide when to leave your employer and how to do it diplomatically.

  • Resignation Letter Template

    Resignation letter templates, formats, examples, samples and writing tips. Includes resignation letter samples and a resignation letter template that you may download for personal use. Also called a letter of resignation.

Losing Your Job

Legal Career Change


  • Job-Seeker Relocation Resources

    Collection of the best relocation and moving tools and resources to assist job-seekers who are considering relocating.

  • Moving Your Career to Another City

    Before you relocate, it is important to distinguish the types of legal professionals that are likely to have the most success in relocating from those who will not have success.

  • New City, New Job: How to Conduct a Long-Distance Job Search

    How do you go about landing a job in a new locale when your current location is far from your destination?

  • Relocating to a New City

    Many lawyers may find themselves in the position where they will have to relocate during some period of their career. Relocation may be necessary for family reasons, to find employment in your desired field or to return home after having attended law school in a different city. Either way there are a few things that one needs to take into consideration when relocating and looking for legal employment.

  • Relocation

    Advice on relocating.

  • Should I Stay or Should I Go?

    What to do when your firm decides to relocate.

Alternative Legal Work Options

Legal Articles Related to Employment and Labor

  • Should I Settle My Workers’ Compensation Case as the Insurance Company or Attorney Wants Me to Settle?
    The decision to settle can never be an easy decision to make.  Many different factors need to be weighed into your decision.  It is imperative that all of your options have been discussed so that an informed decision can be made.
  • Can a Disabled Employee Request to Work from Home?
    An employee’s disability or medical condition may temporarily or permanently prevent the employee from accessing or reporting to the job site, or from performing his or her job functions there. If the employee can perform his or her job at home, without undue hardship to the employer, the employee can request to work at home as a reasonable accommodation.
  • An Employee's Sleep Disorder Could Be a Company's Liability
    Any sleep disorder can pose a serious safety hazard, in and out of the workplace. And yet, a lot of recent research is pointing to employers as having a more prominent role in their workers' sleep disorders than what has been previously thought. This is leading to questions of potential employer liability when workers injure others – on and off the job – because of work-induced sleep problems.
  • How to Request a Reasonable Accommodation at Work
    The Americans With Disabilities Act (ADA) requires covered employers to provide reasonable accommodations for employees with disabilities. A reasonable accommodation is a modification to a disabled employee’s work environment that enables the employee to perform the “essential job functions” of his or her position.
  • Surprising Facts about Wage and Hour Violations
    It is a commonly accepted idea that the world revolves around money. Sure, some can argue it is possible to free yourself of the pull money has on your life, but at the end of the day, if you reside in the United States of America money is a key part of your life.
  • Employee Social Behavior: The New Business Environment
    There is unease and confusion among both people in the workforce and business leaders over the changing nature of labor law, and developing changes in employer-employee relationships.
  • NYC Creates Claim Against Employers for Avoiding Cooperative Dialogues with Disabled Workers
    A new law creates an independent cause of action against employers in New York City for avoiding cooperative dialogues with disabled employees or other eligible employees. (#CooperativeDialogue; #Disability; #InteractiveProcess; #ReasonableAccommodation)
  • America's Opioid Crisis Is Now in the Workplace: How Employers Can Manage the Crisis
    The American workplace is reaping the fallout from a drug-infested society.
  • When Employers Can Be Held Vicariously Liable for Criminal Acts of Employees
    It is essential for an employer to fully understand vicarious liability so that the business and those working for it are not to blame when an employee commits acts of illegal activity. However, there are certain instances where the company cannot avoid the unlawful behavior, and then it is about keeping the entity as clean as possible.
  • Are You Entitled to Be Compensated for Travel Time?
    Travel Time Compensation For The Non-Exempt Employee The Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) requires employers to pay overtime to non-exempt employees, for time worked that exceeds the employee’s usual work time in the employee’s field. Generally, hours worked over 40 hours in a week must be compensated at least one and one-half times the employee’s regular rate of pay.

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