Extradition

Extradition refers to the transfer of an accused criminal from one country to another. In the best of circumstances, extradition reflects a fundamental agreement between civilized nations that sufficiently serious crimes must not go unpunished. However, extradition is often used for political purposes, not just legal ones.

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All Articles »Extradition - Recent Legal Articles

  • International Crimes and Extradition
      by HG.org

    When someone has been accused of a crime, he or she is usually provided the right of a fair trial. However, some of these situations involve extradition to his or her country of origin, and this could lead to complications in ensuring he or she has been punished in accordance with the international courts.

  • Immigrants Are Essential to the Economy

    Immigration is a heated issue in America, largely because of the politics involved. Setting politics aside, consider the ramifications of reducing immigration on the economy. To understand why immigrants are essential to the economy the numbers, rather than political passions, must be considered.

  • How Expert Witnesses Are Tapped for Immigration Cases
      by HG.org

    Immigration cases are often complicated when there are multiple factors or enough elements to cause a success for either side to be uncertain. Various immigration issues stem from those seeking asylum in the United States when they cannot remain in their own country.

  • Why Green Card Holders Must Avoid Voter Registration
      by HG.org

    While green card holders enjoy many of the same rights as American citizens, their rights are not absolute. For example, green card holders do not have the right to sit on a jury or receive funding for post-secondary expenses. Additionally, green card holders do not have the right to vote.

  • Are There Differences between a Visa and a Green Card?
      by HG.org

    There are important differences between a visa and a green card. It is vital that you understand these differences thoroughly before you apply for either one. Not all people are eligible for both types of immigration benefits. While many people believe that visa and green cards are the same. This is not accurate information. Each one has its own purpose and different eligibility requirements.

  • Employment-Based Immigration

    Approximately 140,000 immigrant visas are available each fiscal year for aliens (and their spouses and children) who seek to immigrate based on their job skills. If you have the right combination of skills, education, and/or work experience and are otherwise eligible, you may be able to live permanently in the United States. The five employment-based immigrant visa preferences (categories) are listed below.

  • What Happens When a Person is Charged with Illegal Reentry?

    Returning to the United States after being deported or removed is a violation of federal law. Alleged offenders could be sentenced to prison before being returned to their home countries—where they could face additional consequences as well.

  • Requirements for Naturalization

    Becoming a naturalized citizen can be a challenging process but if you meet any or all of the below guidelines the process can become much simpler. We have detailed what to consider when trying to obtain your naturalized citizen when the time comes.

  • How Do I Qualify for Prosecutorial Discretion in My Immigration Case?
      by HG.org

    In many cases, pursing prosecutorial discretion is a last-ditch effort to avoid being removed from the country. This pursuit asks the United States Immigration and Customs Enforcement use its discretion to the benefit of the immigrant.

  • If I Am Not a Citizen, Can I Be Deported if I Am Convicted of a Crime?
      by HG.org

    Individuals who do not have citizenship status do not have as many rights as citizens and must constantly worry about whatever immigration status they have being stripped away from them. Being convicted of a crime may very well mean that an individual can be deported from the United States. Being aware of these consequences from the beginning of the case can help individuals make more informed choices.


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