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  • Employer Claims I Am an Independent Contractor but I Never Signed Paperwork
      by HG.org

    Employers often hire independent contractors to perform work that is similar to the work employees perform. However, there are several advantages to employers hiring independent contractors, including not having to collect and pay payroll taxes for independent contractors. Employers withhold income tax, Social Security and Medicare tax from employee wages.

  • Employer Claims I Am an Independent Contractor but I Never Signed Paperwork
      by HG.org

    Employers often hire independent contractors to perform work that is similar to the work employees perform. However, there are several advantages to employers hiring independent contractors, including not having to collect and pay payroll taxes for independent contractors. Employers withhold income tax, Social Security and Medicare tax from employee wages.

  • Are Wages to Independent Contractors Subject to Garnishment?
      by HG.org

    Persons that work for themselves are considered independent contractors even if they are employed within the building of a company. These individuals are not considered employees and may not be subject to various regulations or stipulations, and this means that numerous aspects do not apply to these persons as they would a standard employee.

  • Ride-Sharing App Assigned Me a Passenger with a Fare Exceeding the Cap. Now I Can't Get Paid
      by HG.org

    Employment and labor laws apply to companies within the United States. This means that every state within the country is required to ensure that the proper and predetermined payment is provided to these persons based on the laws of the land, so if these regulations are violated, the worker may be entitled to compensation.

  • Former Independent Contractors Breach of Non-Solicitation Clause
      by HG.org

    When a business owner or manager has independent contractors, he or she often has them sign certain contracts that bind them to terms and conditions. If these individuals break the contract or breach the terms, they could be taken to court and the clauses may be enforced when necessary.

  • Planning for Technological Disruption in Small Business

    Technological disruptions are already changing the face of American business. We can assume that things are going to become more chaotic, rather than less, with changing regulatory compliance burdens, outsourcing, and automation. With the rapid rate of both internal and external change, one way business leadership can plan for agile adaptation is to write employment contracts and job descriptions with an eye to changing roles.

  • Legal Requirements for Freelancers
      by HG.org

    Freelancing legal requirements and aspects are often confusing to those that have only just started or that have not fully researched these matters. It is important for a freelancer to know what is legally required for the job, for tax purposes, the government and for his or her own personal protection.

  • Legal Risks of Recruiting Employees from Social Media
      by HG.org

    Social media websites and other areas have been a major boon to businesses in finding assistance with all manner of materials, resources and employment opportunities. However, there could be legal risks that complicate these matters such as when the right contract has not been drafted the individual could leak vital data.

  • Risks Associated with Unpaid Internships
      by HG.org

    Interns are used widely in companies where these individuals learn the tips, tricks, procedures and processes within a company so that they may be hired on with the experience needed to do the job at the hiring point. However, many internships are unpaid, and numerous persons that work through an internship do so at the behest of a college course.

  • New York City Curtails Retail Businesses' and Fast Food Chains' Discretion in Scheduling Workers' Shifts

    New laws in New York City substantially limit retail employers' and fast food establishments' discretion in scheduling work shifts for their employees.


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